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The Unequal Impact of Natural Light on Crime

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  • Tealde, Emiliano

Abstract

This paper studies the relationship between ambient light and criminal activity. A Becker-style crime model is developed where it is shown that in areas with less public lighting a sudden increase in ambient light produces a higher reduction in crime. The Daylight Saving Time, the natural experiment used, induces a sharp increase in natural light during crime-intense hours. Using geolocated data on crime and public lighting for the city of Montevideo in Uruguay, regression discontinuity estimates identify a strong and statistically significant decrease in robbery of 17-percent. The decrease is larger in poorly lit areas. Computing the level of public lighting at which DST has no effect on crime reduction, we identify the minimum level of public lighting that an area should target.

Suggested Citation

  • Tealde, Emiliano, 2020. "The Unequal Impact of Natural Light on Crime," GLO Discussion Paper Series 663, Global Labor Organization (GLO).
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:glodps:663
    as

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    File URL: https://www.econstor.eu/bitstream/10419/224147/1/GLO-DP-0663.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    DST; property crime; public lighting; heterogeneous effects;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • K24 - Law and Economics - - Regulation and Business Law - - - Cyber Law

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