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Using Terror Alert Levels to Estimate the Effect of Police on Crime

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  • Jonathan Klick

    (Florida State University)

  • Alexander Tabarrok

    (George Mason University)

Abstract

Changes in the terror alert level set by the Department of Homeland Security provide a shock to police presence in Washington, D.C. Using daily crime data during the period the terror alert system has been in place, we show that the level of crime decreases significantly, both statistically and economically, during high-alert periods. The decrease in the level of crime is especially large in the National Mall. This provides strong evidence of the causal effect of police on the level of crime and suggests a research strategy that can be used in other cities.
(This abstract was borrowed from another version of this item.)

Suggested Citation

  • Jonathan Klick & Alexander Tabarrok, "undated". "Using Terror Alert Levels to Estimate the Effect of Police on Crime," American Law & Economics Association Annual Meetings 1042, American Law & Economics Association.
  • Handle: RePEc:bep:alecam:1042
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Edward L. Glaeser & Bruce Sacerdote & José A. Scheinkman, 1996. "Crime and Social Interactions," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 111(2), pages 507-548.
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