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When police patrols matter. The effect of police proximity on citizens’ crime risk perception

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  • Daniel Montolio

    (Universitat de Barcelona & IEB)

  • Simón Planells-Struse

    (Universitat de Barcelona & IEB)

Abstract

Crime risk perception is known to be an important determinant of individual well-being. It is therefore crucial that we understand the factors affecting this perception so that governments can identify the (public) policies that might reduce it. Among such policies, public resources devoted to policing emerge as a key instrument not only for tackling criminal activity but also for impacting on citizens’ crime risk perception. In this framework, the aim of this study is to analyze both the individual and neighbourhood determinants of citizens’ crime risk perception in the City of Barcelona (Spain) focusing on the effect of police proximity and taking into account the spatial aspects of neighbourhood characteristics. After controlling for the possible problems of the endogeneity of police forces and crime risk perception and the potential sorting of individuals across neighbourhoods, the results indicate that crime risk perception is reduced when non-victims exogenously interact with police forces. Moreover, neighbourhood variables, such as proxies of social capital and the level of incivilities, together with individual characteristics have an impact on citizens’ crime risk perception.

Suggested Citation

  • Daniel Montolio & Simón Planells-Struse, 2014. "When police patrols matter. The effect of police proximity on citizens’ crime risk perception," Working Papers 2014/1, Institut d'Economia de Barcelona (IEB).
  • Handle: RePEc:ieb:wpaper:doc2014-1
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Crime risk perception; police forces; multilevel ordered logit model;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • C21 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Cross-Sectional Models; Spatial Models; Treatment Effect Models
    • H50 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies - - - General
    • K42 - Law and Economics - - Legal Procedure, the Legal System, and Illegal Behavior - - - Illegal Behavior and the Enforcement of Law

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