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Estimating the Supply of Crime: Recent Advances

In: Handbook on the Economics of Crime

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  • Helen Tauchen

Abstract

While few economists analyzed criminal behaviour and the criminal justice process before Gary Becker’s seminal 1968 paper, an enormous body of economic research on crime has since been produced. This insightful and comprehensive Handbook reviews and extends much of this important resulting research.

Suggested Citation

  • Helen Tauchen, 2010. "Estimating the Supply of Crime: Recent Advances," Chapters,in: Handbook on the Economics of Crime, chapter 2 Edward Elgar Publishing.
  • Handle: RePEc:elg:eechap:13180_2
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    File URL: https://www.elgaronline.com/view/9781847209542.00009.xml
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Lohse, Tim & Pascalau, Razvan & Thomann, Christian, 2014. "Public Enforcement of Securities Market Rules: Resource-based evidence from the Securities Exchange Commission," Working Paper Series in Economics and Institutions of Innovation 364, Royal Institute of Technology, CESIS - Centre of Excellence for Science and Innovation Studies.
    2. Dušek, Libor, 2015. "Time to punishment: The effects of a shorter criminal procedure on crime rates," International Review of Law and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 43(C), pages 134-147.

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