IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/ucp/jlawec/y2006v49i1p249-83.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Neighborhood Crime and Young Males' Job Opportunity

Author

Listed:
  • Ihlanfeldt, Keith R

Abstract

A puzzling aspect of America's crime problem is the concentration of crime in poor, inner-city neighborhoods. The economic model of crime suggests that this concentration may be caused by a dearth of legitimate earnings opportunities for young males living in these neighborhoods. While studies on spatial mismatch in the low-skilled labor market have documented the relatively poor job opportunity possessed by youth in these neighborhoods, there exists no evidence on the role job opportunity plays in explaining the dramatic spatial variation in crime within urban areas. Using a unique panel of neighborhood crime and employment data for Atlanta, I estimate models that control for time and fixed effects, as well as the possible endogeneity of job opportunity. The results suggest that young males' job opportunity plays a key role in resolving the enigma surrounding the high variation in crime across urban neighborhoods.

Suggested Citation

  • Ihlanfeldt, Keith R, 2006. "Neighborhood Crime and Young Males' Job Opportunity," Journal of Law and Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 49(1), pages 249-283, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:ucp:jlawec:y:2006:v:49:i:1:p:249-83
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/504056
    Download Restriction: Access to the online full text or PDF requires a subscription.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Timothy J. Bartik, 1991. "Who Benefits from State and Local Economic Development Policies?," Books from Upjohn Press, W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research, number wbsle.
    2. Keith Ihlanfeldt, 1992. "Job Accessibility and the Employment and School Enrollment of Teenagers," Books from Upjohn Press, W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research, number jaes.
    3. Freeman, Scott & Grogger, Jeffrey & Sonstelie, Jon, 1996. "The Spatial Concentration of Crime," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 40(2), pages 216-231, September.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Nikhil Jha & Cain Polidano, 2016. "Vocational Education and Training: A Pathway to the Straight and Narrow," Melbourne Institute Working Paper Series wp2016n21, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne.
    2. Gaigné, Carl & Zenou, Yves, 2015. "Agglomeration, city size and crime," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 80(C), pages 62-82.
    3. Helen Tauchen, 2010. "Estimating the Supply of Crime: Recent Advances," Chapters,in: Handbook on the Economics of Crime, chapter 2 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    4. Corman, Hope & Dave, Dhaval M. & Reichman, Nancy E., 2014. "Effects of welfare reform on women's crime," International Review of Law and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 40(C), pages 1-14.
    5. Patacchini, Eleonora & Zenou, Yves, 2007. "Ethnicity and Spatial Externalities in Crime," CEPR Discussion Papers 6130, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ucp:jlawec:y:2006:v:49:i:1:p:249-83. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Journals Division). General contact details of provider: http://www.journals.uchicago.edu/JLE/ .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.