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Carl Singleton

Personal Details

First Name:Carl
Middle Name:Andrew
Last Name:Singleton
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:psi653
http://www.carlsingletoneconomics.com/
Twitter: @csingletonecon
Terminal Degree:2017 School of Economics; University of Edinburgh (from RePEc Genealogy)

Affiliation

Department of Economics
University of Reading

Reading, United Kingdom
http://www.rdg.ac.uk/Economics/
RePEc:edi:derdguk (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles Books

Working papers

  1. Carl Singleton & Alex Bryson & Peter Dolton & J. James Reade & Dominik Schreyer, 2021. "What Can We Learn About Economics from Sport during Covid-19?," Economics Discussion Papers em-dp2021-01, Department of Economics, University of Reading.
  2. Alex Bryson & Peter Dolton & J. James Reade & Dominik Schreyer & Carl Singleton, 2021. "What we can learn about economics from professional sport during Covid-19," National Institute of Economic and Social Research (NIESR) Discussion Papers 525, National Institute of Economic and Social Research.
  3. Philip Ramirez & J. James Reade & Carl Singleton, 2021. "Betting on a buzz, mispricing and inefficiency in online sportsbooks," Economics Discussion Papers em-dp2021-10, Department of Economics, University of Reading.
  4. J. James Reade & Dominik Schreyer & Carl Singleton, 2020. "Stadium attendance demand during the COVID-19 crisis: Early empirical evidence from Belarus," Economics Discussion Papers em-dp2020-20, Department of Economics, University of Reading.
  5. Alex Bryson & Peter Dolton & J. James Reade & Dominik Schreyer & Carl Singleton, 2020. "Causal effects of an absent crowd on performances and refereeing decisions during Covid-19," Economics Discussion Papers em-dp2020-18, Department of Economics, University of Reading.
  6. J. James Reade & Carl Singleton & Leighton Vaughan Williams, 2020. "Betting markets for English Premier League results and scorelines: evaluating a forecasting model," Economics Discussion Papers em-dp2020-03, Department of Economics, University of Reading.
  7. Sarah Jewell & J. James Reade & Carl Singleton, 2020. "It's Just Not Cricket: The Uncontested Toss and the Gentleman's Game," Economics Discussion Papers em-dp2020-10, Department of Economics, University of Reading.
  8. Alex Bryson & Peter Dolton & J James Reade & Dominik Schreyer & Carl Singleton, 2020. "Experimental effects of an absent crowd on performance and refereeing decisions during Covid-19," DoQSS Working Papers 20-04, Quantitative Social Science - UCL Social Research Institute, University College London.
  9. J. James Reade & Dominik Schreyer & Carl Singleton, 2020. "Echoes: what happens when football is played behind closed doors?," Economics Discussion Papers em-dp2020-14, Department of Economics, University of Reading.
  10. J. James Reade & Dominik Schreyer & Carl Singleton, 2020. "Eliminating supportive crowds reduces referee bias," Economics Discussion Papers em-dp2020-25, Department of Economics, University of Reading.
  11. Rachel Scarfe & Carl Singleton & Paul Telemo, 2020. "Extreme wages, performance and superstars in a market for footballers," Economics Discussion Papers em-dp2020-04, Department of Economics, University of Reading.
  12. J. James Reade & Carl Singleton, 2020. "Demand for Public Events in the COVID-19 Pandemic: A Case Study of European Football," Economics Discussion Papers em-dp2020-09, Department of Economics, University of Reading.
  13. Daniel Schaefer & Carl Singleton, 2020. "Nominal Wage Adjustments and the Composition of Pay: New Evidence from Payroll Data," Economics Discussion Papers em-dp2020-01, Department of Economics, University of Reading.
  14. Giovanni Razzu & Carl Singleton & Mark Mitchell, 2019. "On why the gender employment gap in Britain has stalled since the early 1990s," Economics Discussion Papers em-dp2019-02, Department of Economics, University of Reading.
  15. Guy Elaad & J. James Reade & Carl Singleton, 2019. "Information, prices and efficiency in an online betting market," Economics Discussion Papers em-dp2019-10, Department of Economics, University of Reading.
  16. Rachel Scarfe & Carl Singleton & Paul Telemo, 2019. "Do high wage footballers play for high wage teams? The case of Major League Soccer," Economics Discussion Papers em-dp2019-04, Department of Economics, University of Reading.
  17. Giovanni Angelini & Luca De Angelis & Carl Singleton, 2019. "Informational efficiency and behaviour within in-play prediction markets," Economics Discussion Papers em-dp2019-20, Department of Economics, University of Reading.
  18. Daniel Schaefer & Carl Singleton, 2019. "Cyclical labor costs within jobs," Economics Discussion Papers em-dp2019-03, Department of Economics, University of Reading.
  19. J. James Reade & Carl Singleton & Alasdair Brown, 2019. "Evaluating Strange Forecasts: The Curious Case of Football Match Scorelines," Economics Discussion Papers em-dp2019-18, Department of Economics, University of Reading.
  20. Razzu, Giovanni & Singleton, Carl & Mitchell, Mark, 2018. "On why gender employment equality in Britain has stalled since the early 1990s," MPRA Paper 87190, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  21. Jewell, Sarah & Razzu, Giovanni & Singleton, Carl, 2018. "Who works for whom and the UK gender pay gap?," MPRA Paper 87191, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  22. Carl Singleton & J. James Reade & Alsdair Brown, 2018. "Going with your Gut: The (In)accuracy of Forecast Revisions in a Football Score Prediction Game," Working Papers 2018-006, The George Washington University, Department of Economics, H. O. Stekler Research Program on Forecasting.
  23. Schaefer, Daniel & Singleton, Carl, 2017. "Recent changes in British wage inequality: Evidence from firms and occupations," MPRA Paper 76744, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  24. Daniel Schaefer & Carl Singleton, 2017. "Real Wages and Hours in the Great Recession: Evidence from Firms and their Entry-Level Jobs," CESifo Working Paper Series 6766, CESifo.
  25. Carl Singleton, 2016. "Long-term unemployment and the Great Recession: Evidence from UK stocks and flows," Edinburgh School of Economics Discussion Paper Series 273, Edinburgh School of Economics, University of Edinburgh.
  26. Giovanni Razzu & Carl Singleton, 2015. "Segregation and Gender Gaps through the UK's Great Recession," Economics Discussion Papers em-dp2015-02, Department of Economics, University of Reading.
  27. Singleton, Carl & Schaefer, Daniel, 2015. "Unemployment and econometric learning," MPRA Paper 63162, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  28. Giovanni Razzu & Carl Singleton, 2014. "Gender and the Business Cycle: A Stocks and Flows Analysis of US and UK Labour Market States," Economics Discussion Papers em-dp2014-10, Department of Economics, University of Reading.
  29. Giovanni Razzu & Carl Singleton, 2013. "Are Business Cycles Gender Neutral?," Economics Discussion Papers em-dp2013-07, Department of Economics, University of Reading.

Articles

  1. J. James Reade & Carl Singleton & Alasdair Brown, 2021. "Evaluating strange forecasts: The curious case of football match scorelines," Scottish Journal of Political Economy, Scottish Economic Society, vol. 68(2), pages 261-285, May.
  2. Bryson, Alex & Dolton, Peter & Reade, J. James & Schreyer, Dominik & Singleton, Carl, 2021. "Causal effects of an absent crowd on performances and refereeing decisions during Covid-19," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 198(C).
  3. Rachel Scarfe & Carl Singleton & Paul Telemo, 2021. "Extreme Wages, Performance, and Superstars in a Market for Footballers," Industrial Relations: A Journal of Economy and Society, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 60(1), pages 84-118, January.
  4. Singleton, Carl & Reade, J. James & Brown, Alasdair, 2020. "Going with your gut: The (In)accuracy of forecast revisions in a football score prediction game," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 89(C).
  5. Elaad, Guy & Reade, J. James & Singleton, Carl, 2020. "Information, prices and efficiency in an online betting market," Finance Research Letters, Elsevier, vol. 35(C).
  6. Daniel Schaefer & Carl Singleton, 2020. "Recent Changes in British Wage Inequality: Evidence from Large Firms and Occupations," Scottish Journal of Political Economy, Scottish Economic Society, vol. 67(1), pages 100-125, February.
  7. Giovanni Razzu & Carl Singleton & Mark Mitchell, 2020. "On why the gender employment gap in Britain has stalled since the early 1990s," Industrial Relations Journal, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 51(6), pages 476-501, November.
  8. Sarah Louise Jewell & Giovanni Razzu & Carl Singleton, 2020. "Who Works for Whom and the UK Gender Pay Gap," British Journal of Industrial Relations, London School of Economics, vol. 58(1), pages 50-81, March.
  9. Schaefer, Daniel & Singleton, Carl, 2019. "Cyclical labor costs within jobs," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 120(C).
  10. Singleton, Carl, 2019. "The public–private sector wage differential in the UK: Evidence from longitudinal employer–employee data," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 174(C), pages 109-113.
  11. Schaefer, Daniel & Singleton, Carl, 2018. "Unemployment and econometric learning," Research in Economics, Elsevier, vol. 72(2), pages 277-296.
  12. Giovanni Razzu & Carl Singleton, 2018. "Segregation and Gender Gaps in the United Kingdom's Great Recession and Recovery," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 24(4), pages 31-55, October.
  13. Carl Singleton, 2018. "Long‐Term Unemployment and the Great Recession: Evidence from UK Stocks and Flows," Scottish Journal of Political Economy, Scottish Economic Society, vol. 65(2), pages 105-126, May.
  14. Razzu, Giovanni & Singleton, Carl, 2016. "Gender and the business cycle: An analysis of labour markets in the US and UK," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 47(PB), pages 131-146.

Books

  1. Razzu, Giovanni (ed.), 2014. "Gender Inequality in the Labour Market in the UK," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780199686483.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. J. James Reade & Dominik Schreyer & Carl Singleton, 2020. "Stadium attendance demand during the COVID-19 crisis: Early empirical evidence from Belarus," Economics Discussion Papers em-dp2020-20, Department of Economics, University of Reading.

    Cited by:

    1. Beiderbeck, Daniel & Frevel, Nicolas & von der Gracht, Heiko A. & Schmidt, Sascha L. & Schweitzer, Vera M., 2021. "The impact of COVID-19 on the European football ecosystem – A Delphi-based scenario analysis," Technological Forecasting and Social Change, Elsevier, vol. 165(C).
    2. Matthew Olczak & J. James Reade & Matthew Yeo, 2020. "Mass Outdoor Events and the Spread of an Airborne Virus: English Football and Covid-19," Economics Discussion Papers em-dp2020-19, Department of Economics, University of Reading.
    3. Carl Singleton & Alex Bryson & Peter Dolton & J. James Reade & Dominik Schreyer, 2021. "What Can We Learn About Economics from Sport during Covid-19?," Economics Discussion Papers em-dp2021-01, Department of Economics, University of Reading.
    4. J. James Reade & Dominik Schreyer & Carl Singleton, 2020. "Eliminating supportive crowds reduces referee bias," Economics Discussion Papers em-dp2020-25, Department of Economics, University of Reading.

  2. Alex Bryson & Peter Dolton & J. James Reade & Dominik Schreyer & Carl Singleton, 2020. "Causal effects of an absent crowd on performances and refereeing decisions during Covid-19," Economics Discussion Papers em-dp2020-18, Department of Economics, University of Reading.

    Cited by:

    1. Mauro Caselli & Paolo Falco, 2021. "When the Mob Goes Silent: Uncovering the Effects of Racial Harassment through a Natural Experiment," DEM Working Papers 2021/01, Department of Economics and Management.
    2. Colella, F. & Dalton, Patricio & Giusti, G., 2021. "All you Need is Love : The Effect of Moral Support on Performance (Revision of CentER DP 2018-026)," Other publications TiSEM aa76dfa7-73db-45d1-8c47-3, Tilburg University, School of Economics and Management.
    3. Vincenzo Scoppa, 2020. "Social Pressure In The Stadiums: Do Agents Change Behavior Without Crowd Support?," Working Papers 202006, Università della Calabria, Dipartimento di Economia, Statistica e Finanza "Giovanni Anania" - DESF.
    4. Federico Fioravanti & Fernando Delbianco & Fernando Tohm'e, 2021. "Home advantage and crowd attendance: Evidence from rugby during the Covid 19 pandemic," Papers 2105.01446, arXiv.org.
    5. Fischer, Kai & Haucap, Justus, 2020. "Betting market efficiency in the presence of unfamiliar shocks: The case of ghost games during the COVID-19 pandemic," DICE Discussion Papers 349, University of Düsseldorf, Düsseldorf Institute for Competition Economics (DICE).
    6. Bryson, Alex & Dolton, Peter & Reade, J. James & Schreyer, Dominik & Singleton, Carl, 2021. "Causal effects of an absent crowd on performances and refereeing decisions during Covid-19," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 198(C).
    7. Carl Singleton & Alex Bryson & Peter Dolton & J. James Reade & Dominik Schreyer, 2021. "What Can We Learn About Economics from Sport during Covid-19?," Economics Discussion Papers em-dp2021-01, Department of Economics, University of Reading.
    8. Christoph Buehren & Marvin Gabriel, 2021. "Performing best when it matters the most: Evidence from professional handball," MAGKS Papers on Economics 202119, Philipps-Universität Marburg, Faculty of Business Administration and Economics, Department of Economics (Volkswirtschaftliche Abteilung).
    9. J. James Reade & Dominik Schreyer & Carl Singleton, 2020. "Eliminating supportive crowds reduces referee bias," Economics Discussion Papers em-dp2020-25, Department of Economics, University of Reading.
    10. Dominik Schreyer & Benno Torgler, 2021. "Football spectator no-show behavior in Switzerland: Empirical evidence from season ticket holder behavior," CREMA Working Paper Series 2021-06, Center for Research in Economics, Management and the Arts (CREMA).

  3. J. James Reade & Carl Singleton & Leighton Vaughan Williams, 2020. "Betting markets for English Premier League results and scorelines: evaluating a forecasting model," Economics Discussion Papers em-dp2020-03, Department of Economics, University of Reading.

    Cited by:

    1. Fischer, Kai & Haucap, Justus, 2020. "Betting market efficiency in the presence of unfamiliar shocks: The case of ghost games during the COVID-19 pandemic," DICE Discussion Papers 349, University of Düsseldorf, Düsseldorf Institute for Competition Economics (DICE).

  4. Alex Bryson & Peter Dolton & J James Reade & Dominik Schreyer & Carl Singleton, 2020. "Experimental effects of an absent crowd on performance and refereeing decisions during Covid-19," DoQSS Working Papers 20-04, Quantitative Social Science - UCL Social Research Institute, University College London.

    Cited by:

    1. Mauro Caselli & Paolo Falco, 2021. "When the Mob Goes Silent: Uncovering the Effects of Racial Harassment through a Natural Experiment," DEM Working Papers 2021/01, Department of Economics and Management.
    2. Beiderbeck, Daniel & Frevel, Nicolas & von der Gracht, Heiko A. & Schmidt, Sascha L. & Schweitzer, Vera M., 2021. "The impact of COVID-19 on the European football ecosystem – A Delphi-based scenario analysis," Technological Forecasting and Social Change, Elsevier, vol. 165(C).
    3. Fischer, Kai & Haucap, Justus, 2020. "Does crowd support drive the home advantage in professional soccer? Evidence from German ghost games during the COVID-19 pandemic," DICE Discussion Papers 344, University of Düsseldorf, Düsseldorf Institute for Competition Economics (DICE).
    4. Vincenzo Scoppa, 2020. "Social Pressure In The Stadiums: Do Agents Change Behavior Without Crowd Support?," Working Papers 202006, Università della Calabria, Dipartimento di Economia, Statistica e Finanza "Giovanni Anania" - DESF.
    5. Fischer, Kai & Haucap, Justus, 2020. "Betting market efficiency in the presence of unfamiliar shocks: The case of ghost games during the COVID-19 pandemic," DICE Discussion Papers 349, University of Düsseldorf, Düsseldorf Institute for Competition Economics (DICE).
    6. Bryson, Alex & Dolton, Peter & Reade, J. James & Schreyer, Dominik & Singleton, Carl, 2021. "Causal effects of an absent crowd on performances and refereeing decisions during Covid-19," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 198(C).
    7. Dominik Schreyer & Sascha L. Schmidt & Benno Torgler, 2020. "Using reminders with different reward opportunities to reduce no-show behavior: Empirical evidence from a large-scale field experiment in professional sport," CREMA Working Paper Series 2020-19, Center for Research in Economics, Management and the Arts (CREMA).
    8. J. James Reade & Dominik Schreyer & Carl Singleton, 2020. "Stadium attendance demand during the COVID-19 crisis: Early empirical evidence from Belarus," Economics Discussion Papers em-dp2020-20, Department of Economics, University of Reading.

  5. J. James Reade & Dominik Schreyer & Carl Singleton, 2020. "Echoes: what happens when football is played behind closed doors?," Economics Discussion Papers em-dp2020-14, Department of Economics, University of Reading.

    Cited by:

    1. Mauro Caselli & Paolo Falco, 2021. "When the Mob Goes Silent: Uncovering the Effects of Racial Harassment through a Natural Experiment," DEM Working Papers 2021/01, Department of Economics and Management.
    2. Beiderbeck, Daniel & Frevel, Nicolas & von der Gracht, Heiko A. & Schmidt, Sascha L. & Schweitzer, Vera M., 2021. "The impact of COVID-19 on the European football ecosystem – A Delphi-based scenario analysis," Technological Forecasting and Social Change, Elsevier, vol. 165(C).
    3. Fischer, Kai & Haucap, Justus, 2020. "Does crowd support drive the home advantage in professional soccer? Evidence from German ghost games during the COVID-19 pandemic," DICE Discussion Papers 344, University of Düsseldorf, Düsseldorf Institute for Competition Economics (DICE).
    4. Vincenzo Scoppa, 2020. "Social Pressure In The Stadiums: Do Agents Change Behavior Without Crowd Support?," Working Papers 202006, Università della Calabria, Dipartimento di Economia, Statistica e Finanza "Giovanni Anania" - DESF.
    5. Fischer, Kai & Haucap, Justus, 2020. "Betting market efficiency in the presence of unfamiliar shocks: The case of ghost games during the COVID-19 pandemic," DICE Discussion Papers 349, University of Düsseldorf, Düsseldorf Institute for Competition Economics (DICE).
    6. Bryson, Alex & Dolton, Peter & Reade, J. James & Schreyer, Dominik & Singleton, Carl, 2021. "Causal effects of an absent crowd on performances and refereeing decisions during Covid-19," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 198(C).
    7. Dilger, Alexander & Vischer, Lars, 2020. "No home bias in ghost games [Kein Heimspielvorteil bei Geisterspielen]," Discussion Papers of the Institute for Organisational Economics 7/2020, University of Münster, Institute for Organisational Economics.
    8. Bryson, Alex & Dolton, Peter & Reade, J. James & Schreyer, Dominik & Singleton, Carl, 2020. "Experimental Effects of an Absent Crowd on Performances and Refereeing Decisions during COVID-19," IZA Discussion Papers 13578, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    9. Massimiliano Ferraresi & Gianluca Gucciardi, 2020. "Team performance and audience: experimental evidence from the football sector," Working papers 94, Società Italiana di Economia Pubblica.
    10. Christian Deutscher & David Winkelmann & Marius Otting, 2020. "Bookmakers' mispricing of the disappeared home advantage in the German Bundesliga after the COVID-19 break," Papers 2008.05417, arXiv.org, revised Aug 2020.
    11. Dominik Schreyer & Sascha L. Schmidt & Benno Torgler, 2020. "Using reminders with different reward opportunities to reduce no-show behavior: Empirical evidence from a large-scale field experiment in professional sport," CREMA Working Paper Series 2020-19, Center for Research in Economics, Management and the Arts (CREMA).
    12. J. James Reade & Dominik Schreyer & Carl Singleton, 2020. "Eliminating supportive crowds reduces referee bias," Economics Discussion Papers em-dp2020-25, Department of Economics, University of Reading.
    13. Dominik Schreyer & Benno Torgler, 2021. "Football spectator no-show behavior in Switzerland: Empirical evidence from season ticket holder behavior," CREMA Working Paper Series 2021-06, Center for Research in Economics, Management and the Arts (CREMA).
    14. Cueva, Carlos, 2020. "Animal Spirits in the Beautiful Game. Testing social pressure in professional football during the COVID-19 lockdown," OSF Preprints hczkj, Center for Open Science.
    15. J. James Reade & Dominik Schreyer & Carl Singleton, 2020. "Stadium attendance demand during the COVID-19 crisis: Early empirical evidence from Belarus," Economics Discussion Papers em-dp2020-20, Department of Economics, University of Reading.

  6. J. James Reade & Dominik Schreyer & Carl Singleton, 2020. "Eliminating supportive crowds reduces referee bias," Economics Discussion Papers em-dp2020-25, Department of Economics, University of Reading.

    Cited by:

    1. Beiderbeck, Daniel & Frevel, Nicolas & von der Gracht, Heiko A. & Schmidt, Sascha L. & Schweitzer, Vera M., 2021. "The impact of COVID-19 on the European football ecosystem – A Delphi-based scenario analysis," Technological Forecasting and Social Change, Elsevier, vol. 165(C).

  7. J. James Reade & Carl Singleton, 2020. "Demand for Public Events in the COVID-19 Pandemic: A Case Study of European Football," Economics Discussion Papers em-dp2020-09, Department of Economics, University of Reading.

    Cited by:

    1. Matthew Olczak & J. James Reade & Matthew Yeo, 2020. "Mass Outdoor Events and the Spread of an Airborne Virus: English Football and Covid-19," Economics Discussion Papers em-dp2020-19, Department of Economics, University of Reading.
    2. J. James Reade & Dominik Schreyer & Carl Singleton, 2020. "Stadium attendance demand during the COVID-19 crisis: Early empirical evidence from Belarus," Economics Discussion Papers em-dp2020-20, Department of Economics, University of Reading.

  8. Guy Elaad & J. James Reade & Carl Singleton, 2019. "Information, prices and efficiency in an online betting market," Economics Discussion Papers em-dp2019-10, Department of Economics, University of Reading.

    Cited by:

    1. J. James Reade & Carl Singleton & Leighton Vaughan Williams, 2020. "Betting markets for English Premier League results and scorelines: evaluating a forecasting model," Economics Discussion Papers em-dp2020-03, Department of Economics, University of Reading.

  9. Giovanni Angelini & Luca De Angelis & Carl Singleton, 2019. "Informational efficiency and behaviour within in-play prediction markets," Economics Discussion Papers em-dp2019-20, Department of Economics, University of Reading.

    Cited by:

    1. Fischer, Kai & Haucap, Justus, 2020. "Betting market efficiency in the presence of unfamiliar shocks: The case of ghost games during the COVID-19 pandemic," DICE Discussion Papers 349, University of Düsseldorf, Düsseldorf Institute for Competition Economics (DICE).
    2. J. James Reade & Carl Singleton & Leighton Vaughan Williams, 2020. "Betting markets for English Premier League results and scorelines: evaluating a forecasting model," Economics Discussion Papers em-dp2020-03, Department of Economics, University of Reading.

  10. Daniel Schaefer & Carl Singleton, 2019. "Cyclical labor costs within jobs," Economics Discussion Papers em-dp2019-03, Department of Economics, University of Reading.

    Cited by:

    1. Daniel Schäfer & Carl Singleton, 2020. "Nominal Wage Adjustments and the Composition of Pay: New Evidence from Payroll Data," Economics working papers 2020-11, Department of Economics, Johannes Kepler University Linz, Austria.

  11. J. James Reade & Carl Singleton & Alasdair Brown, 2019. "Evaluating Strange Forecasts: The Curious Case of Football Match Scorelines," Economics Discussion Papers em-dp2019-18, Department of Economics, University of Reading.

    Cited by:

    1. Sarah Jewell & J. James Reade & Carl Singleton, 2020. "It's Just Not Cricket: The Uncontested Toss and the Gentleman's Game," Economics Discussion Papers em-dp2020-10, Department of Economics, University of Reading.

  12. Jewell, Sarah & Razzu, Giovanni & Singleton, Carl, 2018. "Who works for whom and the UK gender pay gap?," MPRA Paper 87191, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    Cited by:

    1. Tim Butcher & Karen Mumford & Peter N. Smith, 2019. "The Gender Earnings Gap in British Workplaces: A Knowledge Exchange Report," Discussion Papers 19/10, Department of Economics, University of York.
    2. Amadxarif, Zahid & Angeli, Marilena & Haldane, Andrew G & Zemaityte, Gabija, 2020. "Understanding pay gaps," Bank of England working papers 877, Bank of England.
    3. Li, Jiang & Dostie, Benoit & Simard-Duplain, Gaëlle, 2020. "What Is the Role of Firm-Specific Pay Policies on the Gender Earnings Gap in Canada?," IZA Discussion Papers 13907, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    4. Jaan Masso & Jaanika Meriküll & Priit Vahter, 2020. "The Role Of Firms In The Gender Wage Gap," University of Tartu - Faculty of Economics and Business Administration Working Paper Series 120, Faculty of Economics and Business Administration, University of Tartu (Estonia).
    5. Jones, Melanie & Kaya, Ezgi, 2020. "The Gender Pay Gap: What can we learn from Northern Ireland?," Cardiff Economics Working Papers E2020/9, Cardiff University, Cardiff Business School, Economics Section.
    6. Sophie Clot & Marina Della Giusta & Giovanni Razzu, 2020. "Gender gaps in competition: new experimental evidence from UK," Economics Discussion Papers em-dp2020-15, Department of Economics, University of Reading.
    7. Casarico, A. & Lattanzio, S., 2019. "What Firms Do: Gender Inequality in Linked Employer-Employee Data," Cambridge Working Papers in Economics 1966, Faculty of Economics, University of Cambridge.

  13. Carl Singleton & J. James Reade & Alsdair Brown, 2018. "Going with your Gut: The (In)accuracy of Forecast Revisions in a Football Score Prediction Game," Working Papers 2018-006, The George Washington University, Department of Economics, H. O. Stekler Research Program on Forecasting.

    Cited by:

    1. Bar-Eli, Michael & Krumer, Alex & Morgulev, Elia, 2020. "Ask not what economics can do for sports - Ask what sports can do for economics," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 89(C).
    2. Sarah Jewell & J. James Reade & Carl Singleton, 2020. "It's Just Not Cricket: The Uncontested Toss and the Gentleman's Game," Economics Discussion Papers em-dp2020-10, Department of Economics, University of Reading.

  14. Schaefer, Daniel & Singleton, Carl, 2017. "Recent changes in British wage inequality: Evidence from firms and occupations," MPRA Paper 76744, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    Cited by:

    1. Daniel Schaefer & Carl Singleton, 2017. "Real Wages and Hours in the Great Recession: Evidence from Firms and their Entry-Level Jobs," CESifo Working Paper Series 6766, CESifo.
    2. Sarah Louise Jewell & Giovanni Razzu & Carl Singleton, 2020. "Who Works for Whom and the UK Gender Pay Gap," British Journal of Industrial Relations, London School of Economics, vol. 58(1), pages 50-81, March.
    3. Victoria Gregory, 2020. "Firms as Learning Environments: Implications for Earnings Dynamics and Job Search," Working Papers 2020-036, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, revised 28 Jan 2021.

  15. Daniel Schaefer & Carl Singleton, 2017. "Real Wages and Hours in the Great Recession: Evidence from Firms and their Entry-Level Jobs," CESifo Working Paper Series 6766, CESifo.

    Cited by:

    1. Ms. Era Dabla-Norris & Carlo Pizzinelli & Jay Rappaport, 2019. "Job Polarization and the Declining Fortunes of the Young: Evidence from the United Kingdom," IMF Working Papers 2019/216, International Monetary Fund.
    2. Marco Fongoni, 2018. "Workers' reciprocity and the (ir)relevance of wage cyclicality for the volatility of job creation," Working Papers 1809, University of Strathclyde Business School, Department of Economics.
    3. Sergio Salas, 2020. "A Liquidity Crunch in an Endogenous Growth Model with Human Capital," Working Papers 2020-02, Escuela de Negocios y Economía, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Valparaíso.

  16. Carl Singleton, 2016. "Long-term unemployment and the Great Recession: Evidence from UK stocks and flows," Edinburgh School of Economics Discussion Paper Series 273, Edinburgh School of Economics, University of Edinburgh.

    Cited by:

    1. John Nkwoma Inekwe, 2019. "The exploration of economic crises: parameter uncertainty and predictive ability," Scottish Journal of Political Economy, Scottish Economic Society, vol. 66(2), pages 290-313, May.
    2. Pizzinelli, Carlo & Speigner, Bradley, 2017. "Matching efficiency and labour market heterogeneity in the United Kingdom," Bank of England working papers 667, Bank of England.
    3. Zamanzadeh, Akbar & Chan, Marc K. & Ehsani, Mohammad Ali & Ganjali, Mojtaba, 2020. "Unemployment duration, Fiscal and monetary policies, and the output gap: How do the quantile relationships look like?," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 91(C), pages 613-632.

  17. Giovanni Razzu & Carl Singleton, 2014. "Gender and the Business Cycle: A Stocks and Flows Analysis of US and UK Labour Market States," Economics Discussion Papers em-dp2014-10, Department of Economics, University of Reading.

    Cited by:

    1. Wall, Howard J., 2018. "Sex and the Business Cycle," MPRA Paper 89716, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Giovanni Razzu & Carl Singleton, 2015. "Segregation and Gender Gaps through the UK's Great Recession," Economics Discussion Papers em-dp2015-02, Department of Economics, University of Reading.

  18. Giovanni Razzu & Carl Singleton, 2013. "Are Business Cycles Gender Neutral?," Economics Discussion Papers em-dp2013-07, Department of Economics, University of Reading.

    Cited by:

    1. Timo Baas & Farzaneh Shamsfakhr, 2017. "Times of crisis and female labor force participation - Lessons from the Spanish flu," EcoMod2017 10313, EcoMod.
    2. Ousama Ben-Salha & Zouhair Mrabet, 2019. "Is Economic Growth Really Jobless? Empirical Evidence from North Africa," Comparative Economic Studies, Palgrave Macmillan;Association for Comparative Economic Studies, vol. 61(4), pages 598-624, December.
    3. Bonaventura, Luigi & Cellini, Roberto & Sambataro, Mario, 2018. "Gender differences in Okun's law across the Italian regions," MPRA Paper 87557, University Library of Munich, Germany.

Articles

  1. J. James Reade & Carl Singleton & Alasdair Brown, 2021. "Evaluating strange forecasts: The curious case of football match scorelines," Scottish Journal of Political Economy, Scottish Economic Society, vol. 68(2), pages 261-285, May.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  2. Bryson, Alex & Dolton, Peter & Reade, J. James & Schreyer, Dominik & Singleton, Carl, 2021. "Causal effects of an absent crowd on performances and refereeing decisions during Covid-19," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 198(C).
    See citations under working paper version above.
  3. Singleton, Carl & Reade, J. James & Brown, Alasdair, 2020. "Going with your gut: The (In)accuracy of forecast revisions in a football score prediction game," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 89(C).
    See citations under working paper version above.
  4. Elaad, Guy & Reade, J. James & Singleton, Carl, 2020. "Information, prices and efficiency in an online betting market," Finance Research Letters, Elsevier, vol. 35(C).
    See citations under working paper version above.
  5. Daniel Schaefer & Carl Singleton, 2020. "Recent Changes in British Wage Inequality: Evidence from Large Firms and Occupations," Scottish Journal of Political Economy, Scottish Economic Society, vol. 67(1), pages 100-125, February.

    Cited by:

    1. Daniel Schäfer & Carl Singleton, 2020. "Nominal Wage Adjustments and the Composition of Pay: New Evidence from Payroll Data," Economics working papers 2020-11, Department of Economics, Johannes Kepler University Linz, Austria.

  6. Sarah Louise Jewell & Giovanni Razzu & Carl Singleton, 2020. "Who Works for Whom and the UK Gender Pay Gap," British Journal of Industrial Relations, London School of Economics, vol. 58(1), pages 50-81, March.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  7. Schaefer, Daniel & Singleton, Carl, 2019. "Cyclical labor costs within jobs," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 120(C).
    See citations under working paper version above.
  8. Singleton, Carl, 2019. "The public–private sector wage differential in the UK: Evidence from longitudinal employer–employee data," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 174(C), pages 109-113.

    Cited by:

    1. PETRIC Nicolae, 2019. "Fiscal Pressure In The Eu: An Econometric Approach," Annals of Faculty of Economics, University of Oradea, Faculty of Economics, vol. 1(2), pages 189-199, December.

  9. Giovanni Razzu & Carl Singleton, 2018. "Segregation and Gender Gaps in the United Kingdom's Great Recession and Recovery," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 24(4), pages 31-55, October.

    Cited by:

    1. Izaskun Barba & Belen Iraizoz, 2020. "Effect of the Great Crisis on Sectoral Female Employment in Europe: A Structural Decomposition Analysis," Economies, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 8(3), pages 1-24, August.
    2. Karen García-Rojas & Paula Herrera-Idárraga & Leonardo Fabio Morales & Natalia Ramírez-Bustamante & Ana María Tribín-Uribe, 2020. "(She)cession: The Colombian female staircase fall," Borradores de Economia 1140, Banco de la Republica de Colombia.

  10. Carl Singleton, 2018. "Long‐Term Unemployment and the Great Recession: Evidence from UK Stocks and Flows," Scottish Journal of Political Economy, Scottish Economic Society, vol. 65(2), pages 105-126, May. See citations under working paper version above.
  11. Razzu, Giovanni & Singleton, Carl, 2016. "Gender and the business cycle: An analysis of labour markets in the US and UK," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 47(PB), pages 131-146.

    Cited by:

    1. Idriss Fontaine & Ismael Galvez-Iniesta & Pedro Gomes & Diego Vila-Martin, 2019. "Labour market flows : Accounting for the public sector," Working Papers hal-02334064, HAL.
    2. Magdalena Osińska & Tadeusz Kufel & Marcin Błażejowski & Paweł Kufel, 2020. "Modeling mechanism of economic growth using threshold autoregression models," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 58(3), pages 1381-1430, March.
    3. Daniel Schaefer & Carl Singleton, 2017. "Real Wages and Hours in the Great Recession: Evidence from Firms and their Entry-Level Jobs," CESifo Working Paper Series 6766, CESifo.
    4. Sarah Louise Jewell & Giovanni Razzu & Carl Singleton, 2020. "Who Works for Whom and the UK Gender Pay Gap," British Journal of Industrial Relations, London School of Economics, vol. 58(1), pages 50-81, March.
    5. Razzu, Giovanni & Singleton, Carl & Mitchell, Mark, 2018. "On why gender employment equality in Britain has stalled since the early 1990s," MPRA Paper 87190, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    6. Bod’a, Martin & Považanová, Mariana, 2021. "Output-unemployment asymmetry in Okun coefficients for OECD countries," Economic Analysis and Policy, Elsevier, vol. 69(C), pages 307-323.
    7. Giovanni Razzu & Carl Singleton, 2018. "Segregation and Gender Gaps in the United Kingdom's Great Recession and Recovery," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 24(4), pages 31-55, October.
    8. Alexander Mihailov & Giovanni Razzu & Zhe Wang, 2020. "The Gender Unemployment Gap Across the Euro Area: The Role of Macroeconomic Shocks and Labour Market Institutions," Economics Discussion Papers em-dp2020-26, Department of Economics, University of Reading.
    9. Izaskun Barba & Belen Iraizoz, 2020. "Effect of the Great Crisis on Sectoral Female Employment in Europe: A Structural Decomposition Analysis," Economies, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 8(3), pages 1-24, August.
    10. Carl Singleton, 2018. "Long‐Term Unemployment and the Great Recession: Evidence from UK Stocks and Flows," Scottish Journal of Political Economy, Scottish Economic Society, vol. 65(2), pages 105-126, May.
    11. Karen García-Rojas & Paula Herrera-Idárraga & Leonardo Fabio Morales & Natalia Ramírez-Bustamante & Ana María Tribín-Uribe, 2020. "(She)cession: The Colombian female staircase fall," Borradores de Economia 1140, Banco de la Republica de Colombia.

Books

  1. Razzu, Giovanni (ed.), 2014. "Gender Inequality in the Labour Market in the UK," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780199686483.

    Cited by:

    1. Della Giusta, Marina & Clot, Sophie & Razzu, Giovanni, 2019. "The behavioural foundations of female entrepreneurship: what can experiments teach us?," MPRA Paper 91483, University Library of Munich, Germany.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

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Rankings

This author is among the top 5% authors according to these criteria:
  1. Number of Abstract Views in RePEc Services over the past 12 months
  2. Number of Downloads through RePEc Services over the past 12 months
  3. Number of Downloads through RePEc Services over the past 12 months, Weighted by Number of Authors

Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 35 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-SPO: Sports & Economics (17) 2018-12-03 2019-04-29 2019-04-29 2019-06-17 2019-10-14 2019-12-09 2020-03-30 2020-03-30 2020-05-11 2020-06-08 2020-06-29 2020-08-17 2020-09-28 2020-12-21 2021-01-04 2021-01-18 2021-05-31. Author is listed
  2. NEP-MAC: Macroeconomics (13) 2015-03-27 2016-02-12 2016-04-09 2016-04-23 2017-02-19 2017-03-26 2018-01-15 2018-07-23 2019-04-29 2019-04-29 2019-04-29 2020-02-10 2020-08-10. Author is listed
  3. NEP-EXP: Experimental Economics (9) 2018-12-03 2019-04-29 2020-06-08 2020-06-29 2020-08-17 2020-08-17 2020-09-14 2020-12-21 2021-01-04. Author is listed
  4. NEP-LMA: Labor Markets - Supply, Demand, & Wages (7) 2017-02-19 2017-03-26 2018-01-15 2019-04-29 2020-02-10 2020-03-30 2020-08-10. Author is listed
  5. NEP-EUR: Microeconomic European Issues (6) 2018-01-15 2019-04-29 2019-04-29 2019-04-29 2020-02-10 2020-08-10. Author is listed
  6. NEP-HRM: Human Capital & Human Resource Management (6) 2018-01-15 2019-04-29 2019-04-29 2020-02-10 2020-03-30 2020-08-10. Author is listed
  7. NEP-LAB: Labour Economics (5) 2015-03-27 2016-02-12 2018-07-23 2019-04-29 2019-04-29. Author is listed
  8. NEP-BEC: Business Economics (4) 2017-02-19 2017-03-26 2017-08-27 2020-08-10
  9. NEP-FOR: Forecasting (4) 2018-12-03 2019-04-29 2019-10-14 2020-03-30
  10. NEP-GEN: Gender (3) 2019-04-29 2019-04-29 2020-05-11
  11. NEP-ORE: Operations Research (3) 2019-12-09 2020-09-28 2021-01-18
  12. NEP-CUL: Cultural Economics (2) 2019-04-29 2021-05-31
  13. NEP-DGE: Dynamic General Equilibrium (2) 2015-03-27 2016-02-12
  14. NEP-ENV: Environmental Economics (2) 2020-08-17 2020-08-17
  15. NEP-HIS: Business, Economic & Financial History (2) 2018-07-23 2019-04-29
  16. NEP-HME: Heterodox Microeconomics (2) 2015-03-22 2016-04-23
  17. NEP-CBE: Cognitive & Behavioural Economics (1) 2020-08-17
  18. NEP-CIS: Confederation of Independent States (1) 2020-09-28
  19. NEP-CWA: Central & Western Asia (1) 2021-01-18
  20. NEP-HEA: Health Economics (1) 2020-09-28
  21. NEP-KNM: Knowledge Management & Knowledge Economy (1) 2019-04-29
  22. NEP-LAW: Law & Economics (1) 2020-08-17

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