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Segregation and Gender Gaps through the UK's Great Recession

Author

Listed:
  • Giovanni Razzu

    (Department of Economics, University of Reading)

  • Carl Singleton

    (University of Edinburgh)

Abstract

Gender gaps in work respond to the business cycle. Although there are many potential explanations, this paper tests the simplest. Is this because of the extent of gender segregation in work? A counterfactual-type analysis is constructed which can account for the specific role of combined gender segregation across industry sectors and occupations that existed at the onset of the Great Recession in the UK. Gaps in employment, pay and hours worked are all studied. After accounting for the gender segregation of work at the broad sector and occupation group level, the results contradict the existing narrative that men's employment has been more harshly affected by the recession than women's employment: gender segregation accounts for over two and a half times the actual fall in the gender gap between 2007 and 2011. Results for pay and hours are more mixed. Gender segregation accounts for some of the fall in the pay gap, but does not explain the decline in the hours gap, nor the relatively greater rise in part-time work among men since 2007.

Suggested Citation

  • Giovanni Razzu & Carl Singleton, 2015. "Segregation and Gender Gaps through the UK's Great Recession," Economics Discussion Papers em-dp2015-02, Department of Economics, University of Reading.
  • Handle: RePEc:rdg:emxxdp:em-dp2015-02
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    File URL: http://www.reading.ac.uk/web/FILES/economics/emdp2015117.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Keywords

    gender; employment; hours; gender pay gap; gender segregation; business cycle;
    All these keywords.

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