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Evidence on the dynamics of unemployment by gender

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  • Herve Queneau
  • Amit Sen

Abstract

We present empirical evidence regarding unemployment dynamics for women and men in eight OECD countries. Unit-root tests are used to examine the unemployment dynamics of women and men. Failure to reject the unit-root hypothesis is consistent with unemployment hysteresis. Rejection of the unit-root hypothesis indicates that unemployment dynamics are best explained by the natural rate of unemployment or the structuralist view. We find evidence of gender differences in unemployment dynamics in Canada, Germany and the US, but not in other countries. While there are some differences in the extent of persistence across gender and across countries, the degree of persistence for both female and male unemployment rates is fairly low in all countries. Our results, therefore, contrast with substantial empirical evidence of high levels of unemployment persistence in European countries.

Suggested Citation

  • Herve Queneau & Amit Sen, 2008. "Evidence on the dynamics of unemployment by gender," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 40(16), pages 2099-2108.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:applec:v:40:y:2008:i:16:p:2099-2108
    DOI: 10.1080/00036840600949330
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Marianna Belloc & Riccardo Tilli, 2013. "Unemployment by gender and gender catching-up: Empirical evidence from the Italian regions," Papers in Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 92(3), pages 481-494, August.
    2. repec:kap:iaecre:v:20:y:2014:i:1:p:103-111 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. repec:taf:femeco:v:24:y:2018:i:4:p:31-55 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Dimitrios Bakas & Evangelia Papapetrou, 2014. "Unemployment by Gender: Evidence from EU Countries," International Advances in Economic Research, Springer;International Atlantic Economic Society, vol. 20(1), pages 103-111, February.
    5. Peiró, Amado & Belaire-Franch, Jorge & Gonzalo, Maria Teresa, 2012. "Unemployment, cycle and gender," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 34(4), pages 1167-1175.
    6. Giovanni Razzu & Carl Singleton, 2013. "Are Business Cycles Gender Neutral?," Economics & Management Discussion Papers em-dp2013-07, Henley Business School, Reading University.
    7. Fosten, Jack & Ghoshray, Atanu, 2011. "Dynamic persistence in the unemployment rate of OECD countries," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 28(3), pages 948-954, May.
    8. Giovanni Razzu & Carl Singleton, 2015. "Segregation and Gender Gaps through the UK's Great Recession," Economics & Management Discussion Papers em-dp2015-02, Henley Business School, Reading University.
    9. Joana Passinhas & Isabel Proença, 2019. "Measuring Gender Disparities in Unemployment Dynamics during the Recession: Evidence from Portugal," Working Papers REM 2019/79, ISEG - Lisbon School of Economics and Management, REM, Universidade de Lisboa.

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