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Measuring Gender Disparities in Unemployment Dynamics during the Recession: Evidence from Portugal

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  • Joana Passinhas
  • Isabel Proença

Abstract

We research gender differences in unemployment incidence and persistence during the debt crisis in Portugal. A dynamic random effects probit model is estimated to control for unobserved individual heterogeneity and for the ‘initial conditions’ problem. The estimation uses data from four waves of the Survey on Income and Living Conditions (ICOR) between 2010 and 2013. We find strong evidence of persistence in unemployment, and an indication that men are more prone to endure the negative implications of previous unemployment. Simultaneously, we found evidence of higher probabilities of unemployment for women through a fixed effect that aimed to capture gender discrimination in an unstable labour market. Results suggest that policies to boost employment should accommodate a gender dimension and also have a special focus on the long-term unemployed.

Suggested Citation

  • Joana Passinhas & Isabel Proença, 2019. "Measuring Gender Disparities in Unemployment Dynamics during the Recession: Evidence from Portugal," Working Papers REM 2019/79, ISEG - Lisbon School of Economics and Management, REM, Universidade de Lisboa.
  • Handle: RePEc:ise:remwps:wp0792019
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    unemployment; persistence; unobserved heterogeneity; dynamic random effects models; gender discrimination;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • C23 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Models with Panel Data; Spatio-temporal Models
    • C25 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Discrete Regression and Qualitative Choice Models; Discrete Regressors; Proportions; Probabilities
    • J21 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Labor Force and Employment, Size, and Structure
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • J71 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Labor Discrimination - - - Hiring and Firing

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