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Competition, Takeovers and Gender Discrimination

  • Heyman, Fredrik

    ()

    (Research Institute of Industrial Economics (IFN))

  • Svaleryd, Helena

    ()

    (Research Institute of Industrial Economics (IFN))

  • Vlachos, Jonas

    ()

    (Stockholm University)

Theories of taste-based discrimination predict that competitive pressures will drive discriminatory behavior out of the market. Using detailed matched employer-employee data, we analyze how firm takeovers and product market competition are related to the gender composition of the firm’s workforce and the gender wage gap. Using a difference-in-difference framework and dealing with several endogeneity concerns, we find that the share of female employees increases as a result of an ownership change, in particular when product market competition is weak. Further, increased competition reduces the gender wage gap, especially among highly educated employees. While the estimated wage effect is quite small, the results support the main theoretical predictions.

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Paper provided by Research Institute of Industrial Economics in its series Working Paper Series with number 734.

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Length: 40 pages
Date of creation: 21 Feb 2008
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:hhs:iuiwop:0734
Contact details of provider: Postal: Research Institute of Industrial Economics, Box 55665, SE-102 15 Stockholm, Sweden
Phone: +46 8 665 4500
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  1. Francine Blau & Jed DeVaro, 2006. "New Evidence on Gender Differences in Promotion Rates: An Empirical Analysis of a Sample of New Hires," Working Papers 891, Princeton University, Department of Economics, Industrial Relations Section..
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  8. Heyman, Fredrik & Sjöholm, Fredrik & Gustavsson Tingvall, Patrik, 2006. "Acquisitions, Multinationals, and Wage Dispersion," EIJS Working Paper Series 222, The European Institute of Japanese Studies.
  9. Sandra E. Black & Philip E. Strahan, 2001. "The Division of Spoils: Rent-Sharing and Discrimination in a Regulated Industry," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 91(4), pages 814-831, September.
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  11. Phelps, Edmund S, 1972. "The Statistical Theory of Racism and Sexism," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 62(4), pages 659-61, September.
  12. Betsey Stevenson & Justin Wolfers, 2003. "Bargaining in the Shadow of the Law: Divorce Laws and Family Distress," NBER Working Papers 10175, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  13. Sandra E. Black & Elizabeth Brainerd, 2002. "Importing Equality? The Impact of Globalization on Gender Discrimination," NBER Working Papers 9110, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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  17. Nekby, Lena, 2003. "Gender differences in rent sharing and its implications for the gender wage gap, evidence from Sweden," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 81(3), pages 403-410, December.
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  25. Sandra E. Black & Elizabeth Brainerd, 2004. "Importing Equality? The Impact of Globalization on Gender Discrimination," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 57(4), pages 540-559, July.
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