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Gender Pay Gap Patterns in Domestic and Foreign-Owned Firms

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  • Iga Magda
  • Katarzyna Sa³ach

Abstract

We investigate differences in gender wage gaps between foreign-owned and domestically-owned firms in Poland, a country that has experienced large FDI inflows over the past three decades. We show that according to standard estimates of adjusted gender wage gaps, these differences are much larger in the foreign-owned companies than in the domestic firms. However, we also find that these estimates cannot be trusted because the domestically-owned firms have considerably higher levels of gender segregation. Using a non parametric matching and decomposition technique (Nopo 2008) we find that gender wage gaps in domestically-owned firms are only slightly smaller than those in foreign-owned companies. Women tend to segregate into low-paid jobs in the domestic sector, whereas foreign-owned companies have much larger within-firm differences in earnings. In sum, we find that the nature of gender wage gaps and the factors that underlie them differ between domestic and foreign-owned companies.

Suggested Citation

  • Iga Magda & Katarzyna Sa³ach, 2019. "Gender Pay Gap Patterns in Domestic and Foreign-Owned Firms," IBS Working Papers 05/2019, Instytut Badan Strukturalnych.
  • Handle: RePEc:ibt:wpaper:wp052019
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    gender wage gaps; domestic ownership; foreign ownership; FDI;

    JEL classification:

    • F23 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - Multinational Firms; International Business
    • J16 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination
    • J31 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Wage Level and Structure; Wage Differentials
    • J71 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Labor Discrimination - - - Hiring and Firing

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