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The Effects of Structural Change and Economic Liberalisation on Gender Wage Differentials in South Korea and Taiwan

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  • Seguino, Stephanie

Abstract

This paper investigates the sources of divergent trends in gender wage differentials in two important newly industrialised economies (NIEs), South Korean and Taiwan. As these economies have entered the "post-industrial" phase of development, gender wage differentials in Taiwan's manufacturing sector have widened, while in Korea they have narrowed. Decomposition analysis is used to broadly identify sources of change in gender wage differentials. Multivariate regression analysis is relied on to differentiate the impact on the gender wage gap of (1) macro-levels policies, (2) institutional factors, and (3) shifts in labour demand and supply. In addition to the predictable effects of several standard supply-side variables, in Taiwan physical capital mobility is found to have contributed to a wider gender earnings gap. Women's greater concentration in industries where capital is mobile may explain this result. The effects of capital mobility in Korea appears to differ, which may be due to the dissimilar characters of outward FDI from that country. Copyright 2000 by Oxford University Press.

Suggested Citation

  • Seguino, Stephanie, 2000. "The Effects of Structural Change and Economic Liberalisation on Gender Wage Differentials in South Korea and Taiwan," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 24(4), pages 437-459, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:cambje:v:24:y:2000:i:4:p:437-59
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Chen, Zhihong & Ge, Ying & Lai, Huiwen & Wan, Chi, 2013. "Globalization and Gender Wage Inequality in China," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 44(C), pages 256-266.
    2. repec:bla:indres:v:56:y:2017:i:2:p:319-350 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Latorre, María C., 2016. "A CGE Analysis of the Impact of Foreign Direct Investment and Tariff Reform on Female and Male Workers in Tanzania," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 77(C), pages 346-366.
    4. Goulding, Kristine., 2013. "Gender dimensions of national employment policies : a 24-country study," ILO Working Papers 994843093402676, International Labour Organization.
    5. Matthias Busse & Christian Spielmann, 2006. "Gender Inequality and Trade," Review of International Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 14(3), pages 362-379, August.
    6. Dalgıç, Başak & Fazlıoğlu, Burcu & Varol İyidoğan, Pelin, 2016. "Doğrudan Yabancı Yatırımlar Kadın İstihdamını Artırır mı? Türkiye’de Hizmetler Sektörüne Yakından Bakış
      [Does Foreign Direct Investment Bring Jobs to Women? A Closer Look to Turkish Services Indust
      ," MPRA Paper 70790, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    7. Stephanie Seguino & Caren Grown, 2006. "Gender equity and globalization: macroeconomic policy for developing countries," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 18(8), pages 1081-1104.
    8. Goulding, Kristine., 2013. "Gender dimensions of national employment policies : a 24-country study," ILO Working Papers 994835833402676, International Labour Organization.
    9. James Heintz, 2011. "Global Labor Standards: Their Impact and Implementation," Chapters,in: The Handbook of Globalisation, Second Edition, chapter 13 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    10. Nozomi Kimura, 2016. "Does trade liberalization help to reduce gender inequality? A cross-country panel data analysis of wage gap," OSIPP Discussion Paper 16E002, Osaka School of International Public Policy, Osaka University.
    11. Golan, Jennifer & Lay, Jann, 2008. "More coffee, more cigarettes? Coffee market liberalisation, gender, and bargaining in Uganda," Kiel Working Papers 1402, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW).
    12. Busse, Matthias & Spielmann, Christian, 2003. "Gender Discrimination and the International Division of Labour," HWWA Discussion Papers 245, Hamburg Institute of International Economics (HWWA).
    13. Seguino, Stephanie, 2007. "Is more mobility good?: Firm mobility and the low wage-low productivity trap," Structural Change and Economic Dynamics, Elsevier, vol. 18(1), pages 27-51, March.
    14. Somasree Poddar & Sarbajit Chaudhuri, 2016. "Economic Reforms and Gender-Based Wage Inequality in the Presence of Factor Market Distortions," Journal of Quantitative Economics, Springer;The Indian Econometric Society (TIES), vol. 14(2), pages 301-321, December.
    15. Gunseli Berik, 2006. "Growth with Gender Inequity: Another Look at East Asian Development," Working Paper Series, Department of Economics, University of Utah 2006_03, University of Utah, Department of Economics.
    16. Anderson, Edward, 2005. "Openness and inequality in developing countries: A review of theory and recent evidence," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 33(7), pages 1045-1063, July.
    17. Elissa Braunstein, 2011. "Foreign Direct Investment and Development from a Gender Perspective," Chapters,in: The Handbook of Globalisation, Second Edition, chapter 10 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    18. Seguino, Stephanie, 2006. "The great equalizer?: Globalization effects on gender equality in Latin America and the Caribbean," MPRA Paper 6509, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    19. Rosa Duarte & Cristina Sarasa & Mònia Serrano, 2018. "Structural change and female participation in recent economic growth: A multisectoral analysis for the Spanish economy," UB Economics Working Papers 2018/371, Universitat de Barcelona, Facultat d'Economia i Empresa, UB Economics.
    20. Yana van der Meulen Rodgers & Joseph Zveglich & Laura Wherry, 2006. "Gender Differences In Vocational School Training And Earnings Premiums In Taiwan," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 12(4), pages 527-560.
    21. repec:ilo:ilowps:483583 is not listed on IDEAS
    22. repec:ilo:ilowps:484309 is not listed on IDEAS
    23. Stephanie Seguino, 2008. "Gender, Distribution, and Balance of Payments (revised 10/08)," Working Papers wp133_revised, Political Economy Research Institute, University of Massachusetts at Amherst.
    24. Jayanthakumaran, Kankesu & Sangkaew, Piyapong & O’Brien, Martin, 2013. "Trade liberalisation and manufacturing wage premiums: Evidence from Thailand," Journal of Asian Economics, Elsevier, vol. 29(C), pages 15-23.

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