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Wage differentials between native and immigrant women in Spain: Accounting for differences in support

Author

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  • Catia Nicodemo
  • Raul Ramos

Abstract

Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to quantify the wage gap between native and immigrant women in Spain, taking into account differences in their characteristics and the need to control for common support. If immigrant women are segregated in occupations with few native women, it is important to take this into account to analyse wage differentials between both collectives. Design/methodology/approach - Microdata from the Continuous Sample of Working Histories ( Findings - The results obtained indicate that, on average, immigrant women earn less than native women in the Spanish labour market. This wage gap is bigger when immigrant women from developing countries are considered, but the authors’ main finding is that an important part of this wage gap is related to differences in common support (i.e. immigrant women are segregated in certain jobs with low wages different from those occupied by native women). If the need to control for common support is neglected, estimates of the wage gap will be biased. Originality/value - Studying the case of Spain is particularly interesting because it is a country with abundant and recent immigration. Immigrant women account for more than half of the total immigrants in Spain, and unlike other host countries, they come from a highly varied range of countries, with origins as diverse as Latin America, the Maghreb and Eastern Europe. To the authors’ knowledge, no other study has explicitly focused on the analysis of the wage differential of immigrant women in the Spanish labour market by taking into account the need to control for common support. Moreover, published papers illustrating the potentiality of Ñopo's methodology are also very scarce.

Suggested Citation

  • Catia Nicodemo & Raul Ramos, 2012. "Wage differentials between native and immigrant women in Spain: Accounting for differences in support," International Journal of Manpower, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 33(1), pages 118-136, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:eme:ijmpps:v:33:y:2012:i:1:p:118-136
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Christl, Michael & Köppl-Turyna, Monika & Gnan, Phillipp, 2017. "Wage Differences Between Immigrants and Natives in Austria: The Role of Literacy Skills," GLO Discussion Paper Series 145, Global Labor Organization (GLO).
    2. Carl Lin, 2016. "How Do Immigrants From Taiwan Fare In The U.S. Labor Market?," The Singapore Economic Review (SER), World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd., vol. 61(05), pages 1-38, December.
    3. Gustavo A. García, 2017. "Labor Informality: Choice or Sign of Segmentation? A Quantile Regression Approach at the Regional Level for Colombia," Review of Development Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 21(4), pages 985-1017, November.
    4. Tiiu Paas & Maryna Tverdostup, 2016. "Assessment of labour market returns in the case of gender unique human capital," ERSA conference papers ersa16p157, European Regional Science Association.

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