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Is There a Double-Negative Effect on the Earnings of Immigrant Women?

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  • Charles M. Beach
  • Christopher Worswick

Abstract

This paper examines whether there is a "double-negative" effect on the earnings of immigrant women arising from a possible combined negative impact of gender and birthplace on earnings. The paper finds that a double-negative effect on earnings does not appear to hold across the board for all immigrant women, but is quite marked for highly educated women; and that a conventionally estimated rate of earnings adjustment for immigrant women appears much less than that for men and is not at all statistically significant, so that any initial earnings gap relative to native-born women changes very little over the worker's career.

Suggested Citation

  • Charles M. Beach & Christopher Worswick, 1993. "Is There a Double-Negative Effect on the Earnings of Immigrant Women?," Canadian Public Policy, University of Toronto Press, vol. 19(1), pages 36-53, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:cpp:issued:v:19:y:1993:i:1:p:36-53
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Borjas, George J & Bronars, Stephen G, 1991. "Immigration and the Family," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 9(2), pages 123-148, April.
    2. Grenier, Gilles, 1992. "L’immigration et les revenus relatifs des femmes, des jeunes et des personnes peu scolarisées au Canada," L'Actualité Economique, Société Canadienne de Science Economique, vol. 68(4), pages 697-713, décembre.
    3. Jacob Mincer & Solomon Polachek, 1974. "Family Investments in Human Capital: Earnings of Women," NBER Chapters, in: Marriage, Family, Human Capital, and Fertility, pages 76-110, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Chiswick, Barry R, 1978. "The Effect of Americanization on the Earnings of Foreign-born Men," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 86(5), pages 897-921, October.
    5. Reimers, Cordelia W, 1985. "Cultural Differences in Labor Force Participation among Married Women," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 75(2), pages 251-255, May.
    6. Charles M. Beach & Christopher Worswick, 1993. "Is There a Double-Negative Effect on the Earnings of Immigrant Women?," Canadian Public Policy, University of Toronto Press, vol. 19(1), pages 36-53, March.
    7. Ather H. Akbari, 1989. "The Benefits of Immigrants to Canada: Evidence on Tax and Public Services," Canadian Public Policy, University of Toronto Press, vol. 15(4), pages 424-435, December.
    8. Long, James E, 1980. "The Effect of Americanization on Earnings: Some Evidence for Women," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 88(3), pages 620-629, June.
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