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Adaptation and inequality: children of immigrants in Canadian schools

Author

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  • Christopher Worswick

Abstract

Children of immigrant parents have comparable test scores in reading and mathematics to those of the children of the Canadian born. Children of immigrant parents whose mother tongue is neither English nor French have low performance in vocabulary before age six but performance in mathematics and reading that is comparable to that of the children of Canadian-born parents by age fourteen. The 10th percentile of the vocabulary distribution is lower for children of immigrant parents whose mother tongue is neither English nor French than for children of Canadian-born parents. However, this difference is not present in reading and mathematics test scores.

Suggested Citation

  • Christopher Worswick, 2004. "Adaptation and inequality: children of immigrants in Canadian schools," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 37(1), pages 53-77, February.
  • Handle: RePEc:cje:issued:v:37:y:2004:i:1:p:53-77
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Abdurrahman Aydemir & Wen-Hao Chen & Miles Corak, 2013. "Intergenerational Education Mobility among the Children of Canadian Immigrants," Canadian Public Policy, University of Toronto Press, vol. 39(s1), pages 107-122, May.
    2. Abdurrahman Aydemir & Wen-Hao Chen & Miles Corak, 2009. "Intergenerational Earnings Mobility among the Children of Canadian Immigrants," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 91(2), pages 377-397, May.
    3. Sweetman, A. & van Ours, J.C., 2014. "Immigration : What About the Children and Grandchildren?," Discussion Paper 2014-009, Tilburg University, Center for Economic Research.
    4. Kucera, Miroslav, 2008. "The Educational Attainment of Second Generation Immigrants in Canada: Analysis based on the General Social Survey," MPRA Paper 14036, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    5. Aydemir, Abdurrahman & Chen, Wen-Hao & Corak, Miles, 2005. "Mobilite intergenerationnelle des gains chez les enfants des immigrants au Canada," Direction des etudes analytiques : documents de recherche 2005267f, Statistics Canada, Direction des etudes analytiques.
    6. James Ted McDonald & Christopher Worswick, 2013. "Intergenerational Implications of Immigration Policy on Apprenticeship Training and the Educational Distribution in Canada," Canadian Public Policy, University of Toronto Press, vol. 39(s1), pages 165-185, May.
    7. Miles Corak, 2016. "`Inequality is the root of social evil,' or Maybe Not? Two Stories about Inequality and Public Policy," Canadian Public Policy, University of Toronto Press, vol. 42(4), pages 367-414, December.
    8. McDonald, James Ted & Worswick, Christopher, 2011. "Incidence and Returns to Apprenticeship Training in Canada: the Role of Family Background and Immigrant Status," CLSSRN working papers clsrn_admin-2011-3, Vancouver School of Economics, revised 27 Jan 2011.
    9. Anna Christina D'Addio, 2007. "Intergenerational Transmission of Disadvantage: Mobility or Immobility Across Generations?," OECD Social, Employment and Migration Working Papers 52, OECD Publishing.
    10. Böhlmark, Anders, 2008. "Age at immigration and school performance: A siblings analysis using swedish register data," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 15(6), pages 1366-1387, December.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • J15 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Minorities, Races, Indigenous Peoples, and Immigrants; Non-labor Discrimination
    • I21 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Analysis of Education

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