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The Wage Performance of Immigrant Women: Full-Time Jobs, Part-Time Jobs and the Role of Selection

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  • Dustmann, Christian
  • Schmidt, Christoph M

Abstract

This Paper contrasts labour participation behaviour and wages of native and immigrant women. Since the impact of family structure on labour supply differs between natives and immigrants, we explicitly distinguish between part-time and full-time jobs. The choice of jobs is accounted for by an ordered probit selection model with an incidental threshold, thus offering a flexible strategy to address selection issues in a segmented labour market. Our analysis is based on panel data, allowing us to control for correlated individual-specific effects in both selection- and wage equations. We conclude that migrant women receive lower wages than native women in the same labour market segment, and that this is mainly associated with their relatively low educational endowments. Their relatively high ability to combine full-time work and child rearing somewhat mitigates these disadvantages.

Suggested Citation

  • Dustmann, Christian & Schmidt, Christoph M, 2001. "The Wage Performance of Immigrant Women: Full-Time Jobs, Part-Time Jobs and the Role of Selection," CEPR Discussion Papers 2702, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  • Handle: RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:2702
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    Cited by:

    1. Myck, Michal & Nicinska, Anna & Morawski, Leszek, 2009. "Count Your Hours: Returns to Education in Poland," IZA Discussion Papers 4332, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    2. van Praag, Bernard M. S. & Ferrer-i-Carbonell, Ada, 2001. "Age-Differentiated QALY Losses," IZA Discussion Papers 314, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    3. Beyer, Robert, 2016. "The Labor Market Performance of Immigrants in Germany," Annual Conference 2016 (Augsburg): Demographic Change 145799, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    4. Fertig, Michael, 2004. "The Societal Integration of Immigrants in Germany," RWI Discussion Papers 18, RWI - Leibniz-Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung.
    5. Christian Dustmann & Francesca Fabbri, 2005. "Gender and Ethnicity – Married Immigrants in Britain," CESifo Working Paper Series 1598, CESifo.
    6. Martin Kahanec & Michael Shields, 2013. "The working hours of immigrants in Germany: temporary versus permanent," IZA Journal of Migration and Development, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 2(1), pages 1-15, December.
    7. Fertig, Michael & Schmidt, Christoph M, 2001. "First- and Second-Generation Migrants in Germany - What Do We Know and What Do People Think," CEPR Discussion Papers 2803, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    8. Christian Dustmann & Francesca Fabbri, 2005. "Gender and Ethnicity--Married Immigrants in Britain," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 21(3), pages 462-484, Autumn.
    9. Robert C. M. Beyer, 2017. "The Performance of Immigrants in the German Labor Market," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 892, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
    10. Daniela Piazzalunga, 2013. "Is there a Double-Negative Effect? Gender and Ethnic Wage Differentials," CHILD Working Papers Series 11, Centre for Household, Income, Labour and Demographic Economics (CHILD) - CCA.
    11. Fertig, Michael & Schmidt, Christoph M., 2000. "Aggregate-Level Migration Studies as a Tool for Forecasting Future Migration Streams," IZA Discussion Papers 183, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    12. Patrick McGovern, 2007. "Immigration, Labour Markets and Employment Relations: Problems and Prospects," British Journal of Industrial Relations, London School of Economics, vol. 45(2), pages 217-235, June.
    13. Julie Lacroix & Elena Vidal-Coso, 2019. "Differences in Labor Supply by Birthplace and Family Composition in Switzerland: the Role of Human Capital and Household Income," Journal of International Migration and Integration, Springer, vol. 20(3), pages 659-684, August.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Assimilation; Discrete Choice Models; Segmented Labour Markets;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • J22 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Time Allocation and Labor Supply
    • J31 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Wage Level and Structure; Wage Differentials
    • J61 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Geographic Labor Mobility; Immigrant Workers

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