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Glass ceiling and double disadvantage effects: women in the US labour market


  • Anh Le
  • Paul Miller


Gender pay issues in the US labour market are examined using 1990 and 2000 US Census data for three groups: the native born, immigrants from English-speaking countries and immigrants from non-English-speaking countries. Quantile regression estimates reveal different patterns of wage effects across the wage distribution. Females have lower rates of pay across the entire wage scale. There is minimal evidence of glass ceiling effects. Immigrant women from non-English-speaking countries are argued to experience a double disadvantage effect.

Suggested Citation

  • Anh Le & Paul Miller, 2010. "Glass ceiling and double disadvantage effects: women in the US labour market," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 42(5), pages 603-613.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:applec:v:42:y:2010:i:5:p:603-613
    DOI: 10.1080/00036840701704501

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. David W. Johnston & Wang-Sheng Lee, 2012. "Climbing the Job Ladder: New Evidence of Gender Inequity," Industrial Relations: A Journal of Economy and Society, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 51(1), pages 129-151, January.
    2. Bünstorf, Guido & Krabel, Stefan, 2014. "Gender and Immigration: Double Negative Effects in the Labor Market Outcomes of University Graduates in Germany?," Annual Conference 2014 (Hamburg): Evidence-based Economic Policy 100290, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    3. Arda Aktas & Gokce Uysal, 2011. "Explaining the Gender Wage Gap in Turkey Using the Wage Structure Survey," Working Papers 005, Bahcesehir University, Betam, revised Mar 2012.
    4. repec:bla:intmig:v:51:y:2017:i:2:p:475-505 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Khalid Maman Waziri, 2017. "Generalized Glass Ceilings in the United States – A Stochastic Metafrontier Approach," Working Papers halshs-01569834, HAL.
    6. Catia Nicodemo & Raul Ramos, 2012. "Wage differentials between native and immigrant women in Spain: Accounting for differences in support," International Journal of Manpower, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 33(1), pages 118-136, March.
    7. Eleonora Mussino & Ann-Zofie Duvander, 2016. "Use It or Save It? Migration Background and Parental Leave Uptake in Sweden," European Journal of Population, Springer;European Association for Population Studies, vol. 32(2), pages 189-210, May.

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