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Climbing the Job Ladder: New Evidence of Gender Inequity

  • Johnston, David W.

    ()

    (Monash University)

  • Lee, Wang-Sheng

    ()

    (Deakin University)

An explanation for the gender wage gap is that women are less able or less willing to 'climb the job ladder.' However, the empirical evidence on gender differences in job mobility has been mixed. Focusing on a subsample of younger, university-educated workers from an Australian longitudinal survey, we find strong evidence that the dynamics of promotions and employer changes worsen women's labour market position.

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Paper provided by Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA) in its series IZA Discussion Papers with number 5970.

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Length: 30 pages
Date of creation: Sep 2011
Date of revision:
Publication status: published in: Industrial Relations, 2012, 51 (1), 128 - 151
Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp5970
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  20. Catherine C. Eckel & Philip J. Grossman, 2008. "Sex and Risk: Experimental Evidence," Monash Economics Working Papers archive-09, Monash University, Department of Economics.
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  23. Giuliano, Laura & Levine, David I. & Leonard, Jonathan, 2006. "Do Race, Age, and Gender Differences Affect Manager-Employee Relations? An Analysis of Quits, Dismissals, and Promotions at a Large Retail Firm," Institute for Research on Labor and Employment, Working Paper Series qt9tc8n5j7, Institute of Industrial Relations, UC Berkeley.
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  29. Anh Le & Paul Miller, 2010. "Glass ceiling and double disadvantage effects: women in the US labour market," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 42(5), pages 603-613.
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