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Climbing the Job Ladder: New Evidence of Gender Inequity

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  • DAVID W. JOHNSTON
  • WANG-SHENG LEE

Abstract

An explanation for the gender wage gap is that women are less able or less willing to 'climb the job ladder.' However, the empirical evidence on gender differences in job mobility has been mixed. Focusing on a subsample of younger, university-educated workers from an Australian longitudinal survey, we find strong evidence that the dynamics of promotions and employer changes worsen women's labour market position.
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Suggested Citation

  • David W. Johnston & Wang-Sheng Lee, 2012. "Climbing the Job Ladder: New Evidence of Gender Inequity," Industrial Relations: A Journal of Economy and Society, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 51(1), pages 129-151, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:indres:v:51:y:2012:i:1:p:129-151
    DOI: j.1468-232X.2011.00667.x
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    Cited by:

    1. Adrian Chadi & Laszlo Goerke, 2015. "Missing at Work – Sickness-related Absence and Subsequent Job Mobility," IAAEU Discussion Papers 201504, Institute of Labour Law and Industrial Relations in the European Union (IAAEU).
    2. David W. Johnston & Wang-Sheng Lee, 2013. "Extra Status and Extra Stress: Are Promotions Good for Us?," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 66(1), pages 32-54, January.
    3. Masayuki Morikawa, 2014. "What Types of Companies Have Female and Foreign Directors?," AJRC Working Papers 1404, Australia-Japan Research Centre, Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.
    4. William Magee, 2015. "Effects of Gender and Age on Pride in Work, and Job Satisfaction," Journal of Happiness Studies, Springer, vol. 16(5), pages 1091-1115, October.
    5. Adrian Chadi & Clemens Hetschko, 2015. "How Job Changes Affect People's Lives: Evidence from Subjective Well-Being Data," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 747, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
    6. Javdani, Mohsen & McGee, Andrew, 2015. "Moving Up or Falling Behind? Gender, Promotions, and Wages in Canada," IZA Discussion Papers 9380, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    7. Stijn Baert & Ann-Sophie De Pauw & Nick Deschacht, 2016. "Do Employer Preferences Contribute to Sticky Floors?," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 69(3), pages 714-736, May.
    8. Masayuki Morikawa, 2014. "What Types of Company Have Female and Foreign Directors?," CAMA Working Papers 2014-47, Centre for Applied Macroeconomic Analysis, Crawford School of Public Policy, The Australian National University.
    9. Biewen, Martin & Seifert, Stefanie, 2016. "Potential Parenthood and Career Progression of Men and Women: A Simultaneous Hazards Approach," IZA Discussion Papers 10050, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    10. repec:eee:jeborg:v:146:y:2018:i:c:p:116-140 is not listed on IDEAS
    11. Mary Ann Bronson & Peter Skogman Thoursie, 2017. "The Lifecycle Wage Growth of Men and Women: Explaining Gender Differences in Wage Trajectories," Working Papers gueconwpa~17-17-06, Georgetown University, Department of Economics.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • J16 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination
    • J33 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Compensation Packages; Payment Methods
    • J71 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Labor Discrimination - - - Hiring and Firing

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