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From guests to hosts: immigrant-native wage differentials in Spain

Author

Listed:
  • José-Ignacio Antón
  • Rafael Muñoz de Bustillo
  • Miguel Carrera

Abstract

Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to analyse immigrant-native wage differentials in Spain. Design/methodology/approach - The paper exploits the Findings - The paper finds that, in absolute terms, the latter component grows across the wage distribution, reflecting the existence of a kind of glass ceiling, consistent with the evidence of over-education found in previous research. Originality/value - The paper for the first time explores earnings differentials between immigrant and Spanish workers using a nationally representative database. In addition, standard errors are computed in order to determine if the gaps are statistically significant, a task not addressed by previous works. Finally, the work is relevant as Spain has become a host country only a few years ago.

Suggested Citation

  • José-Ignacio Antón & Rafael Muñoz de Bustillo & Miguel Carrera, 2010. "From guests to hosts: immigrant-native wage differentials in Spain," International Journal of Manpower, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 31(6), pages 645-659, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:eme:ijmpps:v:31:y:2010:i:6:p:645-659
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    2. Husted, Leif & Skyt Nielsen, Helena & Rosholm, Michael & Smith, Nina, 2000. "Hit Twice? Danish Evidence on the Double-Negative Effect on the Wages of Immigrant Women," CLS Working Papers 00-6, University of Aarhus, Aarhus School of Business, Centre for Labour Market and Social Research.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. José-Ignacio Antón & Rafael Muñoz de Bustillo & Miguel Carrera, 2012. "Raining stones? Female immigrants in the Spanish labour market," Estudios de Economia, University of Chile, Department of Economics, vol. 39(1 Year 20), pages 53-86, June.
    2. Rafael Muñoz de Bustillo & José-Ignacio Antón, 2011. "From Rags to Riches? Immigration and Poverty in Spain," Population Research and Policy Review, Springer;Southern Demographic Association (SDA), vol. 30(5), pages 661-676, October.
    3. Christos Koutsampelas, 2012. "Immigration and Poverty: Findings from Cyprus," University of Cyprus Working Papers in Economics 13-2012, University of Cyprus Department of Economics.
    4. Catia Nicodemo & Raul Ramos, 2012. "Wage differentials between native and immigrant women in Spain: Accounting for differences in support," International Journal of Manpower, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 33(1), pages 118-136, March.
    5. Nicodemo, Catia & Ramos, Raul, 2011. "Wage Differentials between Native and Immigrant Women in Spain: Accounting for Differences in the Supports," IZA Discussion Papers 5571, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    6. Pablo Swedberg & Santiago Budria, 2015. "Education and earnings: how immigrants perform across the earnings distribution in Spain," Investigaciones de Economía de la Educación volume 10,in: Marta Rahona López & Jennifer Graves (ed.), Investigaciones de Economía de la Educación 10, edition 1, volume 10, chapter 42, pages 829-842 Asociación de Economía de la Educación.
    7. repec:spr:izamig:v:7:y:2017:i:1:d:10.1186_s40176-017-0094-2 is not listed on IDEAS
    8. Budría, Santiago & Swedberg, Pablo & Fonseca, Marlene, 2016. "Returns to Schooling among Immigrants in Spain: A Quantile Regression Approach," IZA Discussion Papers 10064, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Immigration; Pay; Employees; Spain;

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