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Gender equity and globalization: macroeconomic policy for developing countries

  • Stephanie Seguino

    (Department of Economics, Old Mill 227, University of Vermont, Burlington, VT 05405, USA)

  • Caren Grown

    (Levy Economics Institute, Bard College, Blithewood, Annandale-on-Hudson, New York 12504, USA)

This paper reviews the evidence of gender effects of globalization in developing economies. It then outlines a set of macroeconomic and trade policies to promote gender equity in the distribution of resources. The evidence suggests that while liberalization has expanded women's access to employment, the long-term goal of transforming gender inequalities remains unmet and appears unattainable without regulation of capital, and a reorientation and expansion of the state's role in funding public goods and providing a social safety net. This paper sets forth some general principles that can produce greater gender equality, premised on shifting economies from profit-led, export-oriented to wage-led, full-employment economies. The framework is Kaleckian in its focus on the relationship between the gender distribution of income and macroeconomic outcomes. Copyright © 2006 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

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File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1002/jid.1295
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Article provided by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. in its journal Journal of International Development.

Volume (Year): 18 (2006)
Issue (Month): 8 ()
Pages: 1081-1104

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Handle: RePEc:wly:jintdv:v:18:y:2006:i:8:p:1081-1104
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/journal/5102/home

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