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Engendering Foreign Direct Investment: Family Structure, Labor Markets, and International Capital Mobility

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  • Elissa Braunstein

Abstract

In this paper I develop a theoretical foundation for analyzing how gender roles in the household affect foreign direct investment in a developing country context. It is argued that the extent to which women and men share the costs of social reproduction at the household level is a central determinant of women’s labor supply and the profitability of investment. I combine a model of family structure with a structuralist macromodel to investigate the effects of various public policies on women’s wages and employment. A major goal is to specify the constraints imposed by international capital mobility on the prospects for increased equality and living standards for women. Published in World Development, July 2000, 28(7): 1157-72.

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  • Elissa Braunstein, 2000. "Engendering Foreign Direct Investment: Family Structure, Labor Markets, and International Capital Mobility," Published Studies ps10, Political Economy Research Institute, University of Massachusetts at Amherst.
  • Handle: RePEc:uma:perips:ps10
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Gerald Epstein & Elissa Braunstein, 1999. "Creating International Credit Rules and the Multilateral Agreement on Investment: What are the Alternatives?," Published Studies ps4, Political Economy Research Institute, University of Massachusetts at Amherst.
    2. Stephanie Seguino, 1997. "Gender wage inequality and export-led growth in South Korea," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 34(2), pages 102-132.
    3. Aitken, Brian & Harrison, Ann & Lipsey, Robert E., 1996. "Wages and foreign ownership A comparative study of Mexico, Venezuela, and the United States," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 40(3-4), pages 345-371, May.
    4. Standing, Guy, 1989. "Global feminization through flexible labor," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 17(7), pages 1077-1095, July.
    5. Epstein,Gerald A. & Gintis,Herbert M., 2011. "Macroeconomic Policy after the Conservative Era," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521148412, December.
    6. Robert E. Lipsey, 1999. "The Location and Characteristics of U.S. Affiliates in Asia," NBER Working Papers 6876, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    7. Blecker, Robert A, 1989. "International Competition, Income Distribution and Economic Growth," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 13(3), pages 395-412, September.
    8. Robert E. Lipsey, 1998. "Internationalized Production in Developed and Developing Countries and in Industry Sectors," NBER Working Papers 6405, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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    Cited by:

    1. Saul Estrin & Tomasz Mickiewicz, 2011. "Institutions and female entrepreneurship," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 37(4), pages 397-415, November.
    2. Meghna Dutta, 2018. "Globalisation, Corruption and Women Empowerment," Economic Papers, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 37(3), pages 327-343, September.
    3. Stephanie Seguino, 2000. "Accounting for Gender in Asian Economic Growth," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 6(3), pages 27-58.
    4. Stephanie Seguino & Caren Grown, 2006. "Gender equity and globalization: macroeconomic policy for developing countries," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 18(8), pages 1081-1104.
    5. Stephanie Seguino, 2005. "All types of inequality are not created equal: divergent impacts of inequality on economic growth," Working Papers 10, ECINEQ, Society for the Study of Economic Inequality, revised Oct 2005.
    6. Shahbaz, Muhammad & Ahmed, Khalid & Nawaz, Kishwar & Ali, Amjad, 2019. "Modelling the gender inequality in Pakistan: A macroeconomic perspective," MPRA Paper 97502, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 10 Dec 2019.
    7. Stephanie Seguino & Caren A. Grown, 2006. "Feminist-Kaleckian Macroeconomic Policy for Developing Countries," Economics Working Paper Archive wp_446, Levy Economics Institute.
    8. Nilufer KAYA KANLI & Osman AYDOGUS, 2017. "Ulke Risk Faktorlerinin Dogrudan Yabanci Yatirimlar Uzerindeki Belirleyici Etkisi," Ege Academic Review, Ege University Faculty of Economics and Administrative Sciences, vol. 17(2), pages 179-190.
    9. Stephanie Seguino, 2008. "Gender, Distribution, and Balance of Payments (revised 10/08)," Working Papers wp133_revised, Political Economy Research Institute, University of Massachusetts at Amherst.
    10. Andrew Morrison & Shwetlena Sabarwal, 2008. "The Economic Participation of Adolescent Girls and Young Women : Why Does It Matter?," World Bank Other Operational Studies 11131, The World Bank.
    11. Stephanie Seguino, 2013. "From micro-level gender relations to the macro economy and back again," Chapters, in: Deborah M. Figart & Tonia L. Warnecke (ed.),Handbook of Research on Gender and Economic Life, chapter 20, pages 325-344, Edward Elgar Publishing.
    12. Marie W. Arneberg & John K. Dagsvik & Zhiyang Jia, 2002. "Labor Market Modeling Recognizing Latent Job Attributes and Opportunity Constraints An Empirical Analysis of Labor Market Behavior of Eritrean Women," Discussion Papers 331, Statistics Norway, Research Department.
    13. van Staveren, I.P., 2002. "Towards monitoring mutual trade-gender links," ISS Working Papers - General Series 19102, International Institute of Social Studies of Erasmus University Rotterdam (ISS), The Hague.
    14. Stephanie Seguino & Maureen Were, 2014. "Gendered Perspectives on Economic Growth and Development in Sub-Saharan Africa," WIDER Working Paper Series wp-2014-056, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    15. Betül Gür, 2016. "An Analysis of the Relationship Between Foreign Direct Investment and Sociopolitical Factors via the Use of Panel Regression," Eurasian Eononometrics, Statistics and Emprical Economics Journal, Eurasian Academy Of Sciences, vol. 3(3), pages 43-55, January.

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