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Engendering Foreign Direct Investment: Family Structure, Labor Markets, and International Capital Mobility

  • Elissa Braunstein

In this paper I develop a theoretical foundation for analyzing how gender roles in the household affect foreign direct investment in a developing country context. It is argued that the extent to which women and men share the costs of social reproduction at the household level is a central determinant of women’s labor supply and the profitability of investment. I combine a model of family structure with a structuralist macromodel to investigate the effects of various public policies on women’s wages and employment. A major goal is to specify the constraints imposed by international capital mobility on the prospects for increased equality and living standards for women. Published in World Development, July 2000, 28(7): 1157-72.

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Paper provided by Political Economy Research Institute, University of Massachusetts at Amherst in its series Published Studies with number ps10.

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Date of creation: 2000
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Handle: RePEc:uma:perips:ps10
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  1. Brian Aitken & Ann Harrison & Robert E. Lipsey, 1995. "Wages and Foreign Ownership: A Comparative Study of Mexico, Venezuela and the United States," NBER Working Papers 5102, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Gerald Epstein & Elissa Braunstein, 1999. "Creating International Credit Rules and the Multilateral Agreement on Investment: What are the Alternatives?," Published Studies ps4, Political Economy Research Institute, University of Massachusetts at Amherst.
  3. Robert E. Lipsey, 1998. "Internationalized Production in Developed and Developing Countries and in Industry Sectors," NBER Working Papers 6405, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. Blecker, Robert A, 1989. "International Competition, Income Distribution and Economic Growth," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 13(3), pages 395-412, September.
  5. Robert E. Lipsey, 1999. "The Location and Characteristics of U.S. Affiliates in Asia," NBER Working Papers 6876, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  6. Stephanie Seguino, 1997. "Gender wage inequality and export-led growth in South Korea," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 34(2), pages 102-132.
  7. Standing, Guy, 1989. "Global feminization through flexible labor," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 17(7), pages 1077-1095, July.
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