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Elissa Braunstein

Personal Details

First Name:Elissa
Middle Name:
Last Name:Braunstein
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pbr157

Affiliation

Department of Economics
Colorado State University

Fort Collins, Colorado (United States)
http://www.colostate.edu/Depts/Econ/

: (970)491-6324
(970)491-2925
Fort Collins, Colorado 80523-1771
RePEc:edi:decsuus (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Elissa Braunstein, 2004. "Declining Corporate Income Taxes in the 1990s: A State-by-State Analysis of Effective Tax Rates," Working Papers wp91, Political Economy Research Institute, University of Massachusetts at Amherst.
  2. Gerald Epstein & Elissa Braunstein, 2002. "Bargaining Power and Foreign Direct Investment in China: Can 1.3 Billion Consumers Tame the Multinationals?," Working Papers wp45, Political Economy Research Institute, University of Massachusetts at Amherst.
  3. Elissa Braunstein, 2001. "Shifting From the Home to the Market: Accounting for Women's Work in Taiwan, 1965-1995," Working Papers wp24, Political Economy Research Institute, University of Massachusetts at Amherst.
  4. Elissa Braunstein, 2000. "Engendering Foreign Direct Investment: Family Structure, Labor Markets, and International Capital Mobility," Published Studies ps10, Political Economy Research Institute, University of Massachusetts at Amherst.
  5. Nancy Folbre & Elissa Braunstein, 2000. "To Honor and Obey: Efficiency, Inequality and Patriarchal Property Rights," Published Studies ps11, Political Economy Research Institute, University of Massachusetts at Amherst.
  6. Gerald Epstein & Elissa Braunstein, 1999. "Creating International Credit Rules and the Multilateral Agreement on Investment: What are the Alternatives?," Published Studies ps4, Political Economy Research Institute, University of Massachusetts at Amherst.

Articles

  1. Elissa Braunstein & Mark Brenner, 2007. "Foreign direct investment and gendered wages in urban China," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 13(3-4), pages 213-237.
  2. Elissa Braunstein, 2004. "What Caused the Massachusetts Fiscal Crisis?," Challenge, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 47(4), pages 17-40.
  3. Elissa Braunstein & Nancy Folbre, 2001. "To Honor and Obey: Efficiency, Inequality, and Patriarchal Property Rights," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 7(1), pages 25-44.
  4. Braunstein, Elissa, 2000. "Engendering Foreign Direct Investment: Family Structure, Labor Markets and International Capital Mobility," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 28(7), pages 1157-1172, July.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Blog mentions

As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
  1. Elissa Braunstein & Nancy Folbre, 2001. "To Honor and Obey: Efficiency, Inequality, and Patriarchal Property Rights," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 7(1), pages 25-44.

    Mentioned in:

    1. Sol Invictus
      by Mike Isaacson in Vulgar Economics on 2015-04-06 20:17:00

Working papers

  1. Gerald Epstein & Elissa Braunstein, 2002. "Bargaining Power and Foreign Direct Investment in China: Can 1.3 Billion Consumers Tame the Multinationals?," Working Papers wp45, Political Economy Research Institute, University of Massachusetts at Amherst.

    Cited by:

    1. Schmerer, Hans-Jörg, 2012. "FDI, skill-specific unemployment, and institutional spillover effects," Economics Discussion Papers 2012-2, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW).
    2. Palanca, Ellen, 2006. "China's WTO Entry: Effects on Its Economy and Implications for the Philippines," Philippine Journal of Development PJD 2004 Vol. XXXI No. 2-, Philippine Institute for Development Studies.
    3. You, Kefei & Solomon, Offiong Helen, 2015. "China's outward foreign direct investment and domestic investment: An industrial level analysis," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 34(C), pages 249-260.
    4. Seguino, Stephanie, 2003. "Taking gender differences in bargaining power seriously: Equity, labor standards, and living wages," MPRA Paper 6508, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised Oct 2003.
    5. Diego E. Vacaflores, 2011. "Was Latin America Correct In Relying In Foreign Direct Investment To Improve Employment Rates?," Applied Econometrics and International Development, Euro-American Association of Economic Development, vol. 11(2).
    6. Helga Kristjánsdóttir, 2005. "The Knowledge-Capital Model and Small Countries," EPRU Working Paper Series 05-09, Economic Policy Research Unit (EPRU), University of Copenhagen. Department of Economics.
    7. Tang, Sumei & Selvanathan, E.A. & Selvanathan, S., 2008. "Foreign Direct Investment, Domestic Investment, and Economic Growth in China: A Time Series Analysis," WIDER Working Paper Series 019, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    8. Palanca, Ellen, 2004. "China's WTO Entry: Effects on Its Economy and Implications for the Philippines," Discussion Papers DP 2004-41, Philippine Institute for Development Studies.
    9. Milberg, William., 2004. "The changing structure of international trade linked to global production systems : what are the policy implications?," ILO Working Papers 993701203402676, International Labour Organization.
    10. Seguino, Stephanie, 2007. "Is more mobility good?: Firm mobility and the low wage-low productivity trap," Structural Change and Economic Dynamics, Elsevier, vol. 18(1), pages 27-51, March.
    11. Gerald Epstein, 2011. "The Role and Control of Multinational Corporations in the World Economy," Chapters,in: The Handbook of Globalisation, Second Edition, chapter 9 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    12. Lars WANG & Hidekazu ITOH, "undated". "Economic Effects of Information Technology Oriented Joint Ventures in China: A CGE Analysis," EcoMod2004 330600156, EcoMod.
    13. Krug, B. & Hendrischke, H., 2006. "Institution Building and Change in China," ERIM Report Series Research in Management ERS-2006-008-ORG, Erasmus Research Institute of Management (ERIM), ERIM is the joint research institute of the Rotterdam School of Management, Erasmus University and the Erasmus School of Economics (ESE) at Erasmus University Rotterdam.
    14. A. Yasemin Yalta, 2011. "New Evidence on FDI-Led Growth: The Case of China," Working Papers 1107, TOBB University of Economics and Technology, Department of Economics.
    15. Chan Sok GEE & Mohd Zaini Abd KARIM, 2011. "Fdi´S Country Of Origin And Output Growth: The Case Of Malaysia?S Manufacturing Sector, 1991-2006," Applied Econometrics and International Development, Euro-American Association of Economic Development, vol. 11(1).
    16. Yalta, A. Yasemin, 2013. "Revisiting the FDI-led growth Hypothesis: The case of China," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 31(C), pages 335-343.
    17. Gerald Epstein, 2002. "Employment-Oriented Central Bank Policy in an Integrated World Economy: A Reform Proposal for South Africa," Working Papers wp39, Political Economy Research Institute, University of Massachusetts at Amherst.
    18. Jaydeep Mukherjee & Debashis Chakraborty & Tanaya Sinha, 2013. "How has FDI influenced Current Account Balance In India? Time Series Results in presence of Endogenous Structural Breaks," Working Papers 1317, Indian Institute of Foreign Trade.

  2. Elissa Braunstein, 2000. "Engendering Foreign Direct Investment: Family Structure, Labor Markets, and International Capital Mobility," Published Studies ps10, Political Economy Research Institute, University of Massachusetts at Amherst.

    Cited by:

    1. Stephanie Seguino, 2000. "Accounting for Gender in Asian Economic Growth," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 6(3), pages 27-58.
    2. Seguino, Stephanie & Grown, Caren, 2006. "Gender equity and globalization: Macroeconomic policy for developing countries," MPRA Paper 6540, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Stephanie Seguino, 2005. "All Types of Inequality are Not Created Equal: Divergent Impacts of Inequality on Economic Growth," Economics Working Paper Archive wp_433, Levy Economics Institute.
    4. Marie W. Arneberg & John K. Dagsvik & Zhiyang Jia, 2002. "Labor Market Modeling Recognizing Latent Job Attributes and Opportunity Constraints An Empirical Analysis of Labor Market Behavior of Eritrean Women," Discussion Papers 331, Statistics Norway, Research Department.
    5. Saul Estrin & Tomasz Mickiewicz, 2011. "Institutions and female entrepreneurship," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 37(4), pages 397-415, November.
    6. Stephanie Seguino & Caren A. Grown, 2006. "Feminist-Kaleckian Macroeconomic Policy for Developing Countries," Economics Working Paper Archive wp_446, Levy Economics Institute.
    7. Stephanie Seguino, 2008. "Gender, Distribution, and Balance of Payments (revised 10/08)," Working Papers wp133_revised, Political Economy Research Institute, University of Massachusetts at Amherst.
    8. Andrew Morrison & Shwetlena Sabarwal, 2008. "The Economic Participation of Adolescent Girls and Young Women : Why Does It Matter?," World Bank Other Operational Studies 11131, The World Bank.
    9. Stephanie Seguino, 2013. "From micro-level gender relations to the macro economy and back again," Chapters,in: Handbook of Research on Gender and Economic Life, chapter 20, pages 325-344 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    10. van Staveren, I.P., 2002. "Towards monitoring mutual trade-gender links," ISS Working Papers - General Series 19102, International Institute of Social Studies of Erasmus University Rotterdam (ISS), The Hague.
    11. Betül Gür, 2016. "An Analysis of the Relationship Between Foreign Direct Investment and Sociopolitical Factors via the Use of Panel Regression," Eurasian Eononometrics, Statistics and Emprical Economics Journal, Eurasian Academy Of Sciences, vol. 3(3), pages 43-55, January.

  3. Nancy Folbre & Elissa Braunstein, 2000. "To Honor and Obey: Efficiency, Inequality and Patriarchal Property Rights," Published Studies ps11, Political Economy Research Institute, University of Massachusetts at Amherst.

    Cited by:

    1. K. Powlick, 2009. "The Value of Advanced Interdisciplinary Classes for Students of Economics: Case Study of a 300-Level Class on Gender in the Economy," Forum for Social Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 38(2-3), pages 189-200, January.
    2. Barbara E. Hopkins, 2013. "Gender and provisioning under different capitalisms," Chapters,in: Handbook of Research on Gender and Economic Life, chapter 7, pages 93-112 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    3. Robert Fleck & F. Hanssen, 2009. "“Rulers ruled by women”: an economic analysis of the rise and fall of women’s rights in ancient Sparta," Economics of Governance, Springer, vol. 10(3), pages 221-245, July.
    4. Shahra Razavi, 2011. "Forum 2011," Development and Change, International Institute of Social Studies, vol. 42(1), pages 315-329, January.
    5. Scott Steele, 2002. "Gender-Based Advantage: A Model of Emerging and Constructed Opportunities," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 8(3), pages 77-97.
    6. Elke Holst & Andrea Schäfer & Mechthild Schrooten, 2010. "Gender, Transnational Networks and Remittances: Evidence from Germany," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 1005, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
    7. Julie A. Nelson, 2016. "Male Is a Gender, Too: A Review of Why Gender Matters in Economics by Mukesh Eswaran," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 54(4), pages 1362-1376, December.
    8. K. Powlick, 2009. "The Value of Advanced Interdisciplinary Classes for Students of Economics: Case Study of a 300-Level Class on Gender in the Economy," Forum for Social Economics, Springer;The Association for Social Economics, vol. 38(2), pages 189-200, July.
    9. Stephanie Seguino, 2013. "From micro-level gender relations to the macro economy and back again," Chapters,in: Handbook of Research on Gender and Economic Life, chapter 20, pages 325-344 Edward Elgar Publishing.

  4. Gerald Epstein & Elissa Braunstein, 1999. "Creating International Credit Rules and the Multilateral Agreement on Investment: What are the Alternatives?," Published Studies ps4, Political Economy Research Institute, University of Massachusetts at Amherst.

    Cited by:

    1. Braunstein, Elissa, 2000. "Engendering Foreign Direct Investment: Family Structure, Labor Markets and International Capital Mobility," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 28(7), pages 1157-1172, July.
    2. Robert Pollin, 2000. "Globalization, Inequality and Financial Instability: Confronting the Marx, Keynes and Polanyi Problems in the Advanced Capitalist Economies," Working Papers wp8, Political Economy Research Institute, University of Massachusetts at Amherst.
    3. Gerald Epstein & Elissa Braunstein, 2002. "Bargaining Power and Foreign Direct Investment in China: Can 1.3 Billion Consumers Tame the Multinationals?," Working Papers wp45, Political Economy Research Institute, University of Massachusetts at Amherst.
    4. Gerald Epstein, 2011. "The Role and Control of Multinational Corporations in the World Economy," Chapters,in: The Handbook of Globalisation, Second Edition, chapter 9 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    5. Robert Pollin, 2002. "Globalization and the Transition to Egalitarian Development," Working Papers wp42, Political Economy Research Institute, University of Massachusetts at Amherst.

Articles

  1. Elissa Braunstein & Mark Brenner, 2007. "Foreign direct investment and gendered wages in urban China," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 13(3-4), pages 213-237.

    Cited by:

    1. Priit Vahter & Jaan Masso, 2018. "The Contribution Of Multinationals To Wage Inequality: Foreign Ownership And The Gender Pay Gap," University of Tartu - Faculty of Economics and Business Administration Working Paper Series 106, Faculty of Economics and Business Administration, University of Tartu (Estonia).
    2. Tatli, Ahu & Vassilopoulou, Joana & Özbilgin, Mustafa, 2013. "An unrequited affinity between talent shortages and untapped female potential: The relevance of gender quotas for talent management in high growth potential economies of the Asia Pacific region," International Business Review, Elsevier, vol. 22(3), pages 539-553.
    3. Mukhopadhyay, Ujjaini & Chaudhuri, Sarbajit, 2011. "Economic liberalization, gender wage inequality and welfare – a theoretical analysis," MPRA Paper 32954, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Elissa Braunstein, 2011. "Foreign Direct Investment and Development from a Gender Perspective," Chapters,in: The Handbook of Globalisation, Second Edition, chapter 10 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    5. Somasree Poddar & Sarbajit Chaudhuri, 2016. "Economic Reforms and Gender-Based Wage Inequality in the Presence of Factor Market Distortions," Journal of Quantitative Economics, Springer;The Indian Econometric Society (TIES), vol. 14(2), pages 301-321, December.
    6. Chen, Zhihong & Ge, Ying & Lai, Huiwen, 2011. "Foreign Direct Investment and Wage Inequality: Evidence from China," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 39(8), pages 1322-1332, August.
    7. Latorre, María C., 2016. "A CGE Analysis of the Impact of Foreign Direct Investment and Tariff Reform on Female and Male Workers in Tanzania," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 77(C), pages 346-366.
    8. Dalgıç, Başak & Fazlıoğlu, Burcu & Varol İyidoğan, Pelin, 2016. "Doğrudan Yabancı Yatırımlar Kadın İstihdamını Artırır mı? Türkiye’de Hizmetler Sektörüne Yakından Bakış
      [Does Foreign Direct Investment Bring Jobs to Women? A Closer Look to Turkish Services Indust
      ," MPRA Paper 70790, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    9. Chen, Zhihong & Ge, Ying & Lai, Huiwen & Wan, Chi, 2013. "Globalization and Gender Wage Inequality in China," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 44(C), pages 256-266.
    10. Goulding, Kristine., 2013. "Gender dimensions of national employment policies : a 24-country study," ILO Working Papers 994835833402676, International Labour Organization.
    11. Neumayer, Eric & de Soysa, Indra, 2011. "Globalization and the Empowerment of Women: An Analysis of Spatial Dependence via Trade and Foreign Direct Investment," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 39(7), pages 1065-1075, July.
    12. Gustafsson, Björn & Sai, Ding, 2009. "Rank, income and income inequality in urban China," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 20(3), pages 497-507, September.
    13. Goulding, Kristine., 2013. "Gender dimensions of national employment policies : a 24-country study," ILO Working Papers 994843093402676, International Labour Organization.
    14. Seo-Young Cho, 2011. "Integrating Equality - Globalization, Women’s Rights, Son Preference and Human Trafficking," Courant Research Centre: Poverty, Equity and Growth - Discussion Papers 73, Courant Research Centre PEG.
    15. Dong, Xiao-yuan & Zhang, Liqin, 2009. "Economic transition and gender differentials in wages and productivity: Evidence from Chinese manufacturing enterprises," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 88(1), pages 144-156, January.
    16. Gustafsson, Björn Anders & Sai, Ding, 2008. "Rank, Income and Income Inequality in Urban China," IZA Discussion Papers 3843, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    17. Hung-Yang Lin, 2013. "Benchmarking Policy Inputs and Social Outputs of Retirement Payment Schemes: China, Hong Kong, Singapore and Taiwan Compared With the Three Worlds," International Journal of Asian Social Science, Asian Economic and Social Society, vol. 3(6), pages 1328-1344, June.

  2. Elissa Braunstein & Nancy Folbre, 2001. "To Honor and Obey: Efficiency, Inequality, and Patriarchal Property Rights," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 7(1), pages 25-44.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  3. Braunstein, Elissa, 2000. "Engendering Foreign Direct Investment: Family Structure, Labor Markets and International Capital Mobility," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 28(7), pages 1157-1172, July.
    See citations under working paper version above.

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

Access and download statistics for all items

Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 4 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-IFN: International Finance (2) 2002-09-21 2002-12-02
  2. NEP-SEA: South East Asia (2) 2002-09-21 2002-09-28
  3. NEP-COM: Industrial Competition (1) 2002-12-02
  4. NEP-LAB: Labour Economics (1) 2002-09-28
  5. NEP-MIC: Microeconomics (1) 2002-10-10

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