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Central bank policy and gender

In: Handbook of Research on Gender and Economic Life

Author

Listed:
  • Elissa Braunstein

Abstract

The Handbook illuminates complex facets of the economic and social provisioning process across the globe. The contributors – academics, policy analysts and practitioners from wide-ranging areas of expertise – discuss the methodological approaches to, and analytical tools for, conducting research on the gender dimension of economic life. They also provide analyses of major issues facing both developed and developing countries. Topics explored include civil society, discrimination, informal work, working time, central bank policy, health, education, food security, poverty, migration, environmental activism and the financial crisis.

Suggested Citation

  • Elissa Braunstein, 2013. "Central bank policy and gender," Chapters,in: Handbook of Research on Gender and Economic Life, chapter 21, pages 345-358 Edward Elgar Publishing.
  • Handle: RePEc:elg:eechap:14323_21
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Kenneth Rogoff, 1985. "The Optimal Degree of Commitment to an Intermediate Monetary Target," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 100(4), pages 1169-1189.
    2. Arjun Jayadev, 2008. "The class content of preferences towards anti-inflation and anti-unemployment policies," International Review of Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 22(2), pages 161-172.
    3. Gerald Epstein, 2003. "Alternatives to Inflation Targeting Monetary Policy for Stable and Egalitarian Growth: A Brief Research Summary," Working Papers wp62, Political Economy Research Institute, University of Massachusetts at Amherst.
    4. Yann Algan & Pierre Cahuc, 2006. "Job Protection: The Macho Hypothesis," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 22(3), pages 390-410, Autumn.
    5. Dutt, Amitava K. & Ros, Jaime, 2007. "Aggregate demand shocks and economic growth," Structural Change and Economic Dynamics, Elsevier, vol. 18(1), pages 75-99, March.
    6. Robert J. MacCulloch & Rafael Di Tella & Andrew J. Oswald, 2001. "Preferences over Inflation and Unemployment: Evidence from Surveys of Happiness," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 91(1), pages 335-341, March.
    7. Thorbecke, Willem, 2001. "Estimating the effects of disinflationary monetary policy on minorities," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 23(1), pages 51-66, January.
    8. Ruprah, Inder J. & Luengas, Pavel, 2011. "Monetary policy and happiness: Preferences over inflation and unemployment in Latin America," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 40(1), pages 59-66, February.
    9. James Heintz & Léonce Ndikumana, 2011. "Is There a Case for Formal Inflation Targeting in Sub-Saharan Africa?-super- 1," Journal of African Economies, Centre for the Study of African Economies (CSAE), vol. 20(suppl_2), pages -103, May.
    10. Stephanie Seguino & James Heintz, 2012. "Monetary Tightening and the Dynamics of US Race and Gender Stratification," American Journal of Economics and Sociology, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 71(3), pages 603-638, July.
    11. Wolfers, Justin, 2003. "Is Business Cycle Volatility Costly? Evidence from Surveys of Subjective Well-Being," International Finance, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 6(1), pages 1-26, Spring.
    12. Giuseppe Fontana & Alfonso Palacio-Vera, 2007. "Are Long-Run Price Stability And Short-Run Output Stabilization All That Monetary Policy Can Aim For?," Metroeconomica, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 58(2), pages 269-298, May.
    13. Elson, Diane & Cagatay, Nilufer, 2000. "The Social Content of Macroeconomic Policies," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 28(7), pages 1347-1364, July.
    14. Olivier Jean Blanchard, 1995. "Macroeconomic implications of shifts in the relative demand for skills," Economic Policy Review, Federal Reserve Bank of New York, issue Jan, pages 48-53.
    15. Lucas, Robert E, Jr, 1973. "Some International Evidence on Output-Inflation Tradeoffs," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 63(3), pages 326-334, June.
    16. repec:mes:challe:v:42:y:1999:i:6:p:103-111 is not listed on IDEAS
    17. Caren Grown & Emcet Tas, 2010. "Gender Equality in the US Labor Markets in the "Great Recession" of 2007-2010," Working Papers 2010-15, American University, Department of Economics.
    18. Elissa Braunstein & James Heintz, 2008. "Gender bias and central bank policy: employment and inflation reduction," International Review of Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 22(2), pages 173-186.
    19. Jayadev, Arjun, 2006. "Differing preferences between anti-inflation and anti-unemployment policy among the rich and the poor," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 91(1), pages 67-71, April.
    20. M. Anne Hill & Elizabeth King, 1995. "Women's education and economic well-being," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 1(2), pages 21-46.
    21. Stephan Klasen & Francesca Lamanna, 2009. "The Impact of Gender Inequality in Education and Employment on Economic Growth: New Evidence for a Panel of Countries," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 15(3), pages 91-132.
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