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The class content of preferences towards anti-inflation and anti-unemployment policies

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  • Arjun Jayadev

Abstract

This paper assesses class-based preferences towards anti-inflationary and anti-unemployment policy. Using a consistent cross-country social survey, I find that the working class broadly defined, and those with lower occupational skill and status are more likely to prioritize combating unemployment rather than inflation. The result that the working class is less 'relatively inflation averse' is robust to the inclusion of several plausible controls. In addition, I find that those respondents who exhibit a broadly pro-business and anti-redistributionary attitude are more relatively inflation averse. The finding that inflation and unemployment aversion have a distinct class character has implications for current debates on the implications of macroeconomic policies such as inflation targeting.

Suggested Citation

  • Arjun Jayadev, 2008. "The class content of preferences towards anti-inflation and anti-unemployment policies," International Review of Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 22(2), pages 161-172.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:irapec:v:22:y:2008:i:2:p:161-172
    DOI: 10.1080/02692170701880643
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Barro, Robert J & Gordon, David B, 1983. "A Positive Theory of Monetary Policy in a Natural Rate Model," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 91(4), pages 589-610, August.
    2. Robert J. MacCulloch & Rafael Di Tella & Andrew J. Oswald, 2001. "Preferences over Inflation and Unemployment: Evidence from Surveys of Happiness," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 91(1), pages 335-341, March.
    3. Alex Cukierman, 1992. "Central Bank Strategy, Credibility, and Independence: Theory and Evidence," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 0262031981, January.
    4. Easterly, William & Fischer, Stanley, 2001. "Inflation and the Poor," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 33(2), pages 160-178, May.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. repec:zbw:hohpro:343 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Epstein, Gerald., 2009. "Rethinking monetary and financial policy : practical suggestions for monitoring financial stability while generating employment and poverty reduction," ILO Working Papers 994344393402676, International Labour Organization.
    3. Néstor Gándelman & Rubén Hernández-Murillo, 2009. "The impact of inflation and unemployment on subjective personal and country evaluations," Review, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, issue May, pages 107-126.
    4. repec:ilo:ilowps:434439 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Heinz Welsch & Jan K¨¹hling, 2015. "Macroeconomic Preferences by Income and Education Level: Evidence from Subjective Well-Being Data," Review of Economics & Finance, Better Advances Press, Canada, vol. 5, pages 15-32, August.
    6. Heinz Welsch & Jan Kühling, 2011. "Anti-Inflation Policy Benefits the Poor: Evidence from Subjective Well-Being Data," Working Papers V-343-11, University of Oldenburg, Department of Economics, revised Dec 2011.
    7. repec:old:wpaper:343 is not listed on IDEAS
    8. Gerald Epstein, 2007. "Central banks as agents of employment creation," Working Papers 38, United Nations, Department of Economics and Social Affairs.
    9. Elissa Braunstein, 2013. "Central bank policy and gender," Chapters,in: Handbook of Research on Gender and Economic Life, chapter 21, pages 345-358 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    10. Gerald Epstein, 2009. "Rethinking Monetary and Financial Policy: Practical suggestions for monitoring financial stability while generating employment and poverty reduction," Published Studies ilo_epstein11_09, Political Economy Research Institute, University of Massachusetts at Amherst.
    11. Valdivia, Daney & Loayza, Lilian, 2010. "Adopción de metas de inflación y su impacto en las expectativas de inflación y volatilidad del crecimiento económico: evidencia empírica para Bolivia
      [Inflation targeting and its impact on the infl
      ," MPRA Paper 37328, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 25 Aug 2011.

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