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Are Long-run Price Stability and Short-run Output Stabilization All that Monetary Policy Can Aim For?

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  • Giuseppe Fontana
  • Alfonso Palacio-Vera

Abstract

A central tenet of the so-called new consensus view in macroeconomics is that there is no long-run trade-off between inflation and unemployment. The main policy implication of this principle is that all monetary policy can aim for is (modest) short-run output stabilization and long-run price stability i.e., monetary policy is neutral with respect to output and employment in the long run. However, research on the different sources of path dependency in the economy suggests that persistent but nevertheless transitory changes in aggregate demand may have a permanent effect on output and employment. If this is the case, then, the way monetary policy is run does have long-run effects on real variables. This paper provides an overview of this research and explores how monetary policy should be implemented once these long-run effects are acknowledged.

Suggested Citation

  • Giuseppe Fontana & Alfonso Palacio-Vera, 2005. "Are Long-run Price Stability and Short-run Output Stabilization All that Monetary Policy Can Aim For?," Economics Working Paper Archive wp_430, Levy Economics Institute.
  • Handle: RePEc:lev:wrkpap:wp_430
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Eckhard Hein & Achim Truger, 2011. "Fiscal Policy in the Macroeconomic Policy Mix: A Critique of the New Consensus Model and a Comparison of Macroeconomic Policies in France, Germany, the UK and Sweden from a Post-Keynesian Perspective," Chapters,in: Credit, Money and Macroeconomic Policy, chapter 12 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    2. P Arestis & A Mihailov, 2009. "Flexible Rules cum Constrained Discretion: A New Consensus in Monetary Policy," Economic Issues Journal Articles, Economic Issues, vol. 14(2), pages 27-54, September.
    3. Hein, Eckhard & Schoder, Christian, 2009. "Interest rates, distribution and capital accumulation: A Post-Kaleckian perspective on the US and Germany," IPE Working Papers 04/2009, Berlin School of Economics and Law, Institute for International Political Economy (IPE).
    4. Eckhard Hein & Lena Vogel, 2007. "Distribution and growth reconsidered - empirical results for Austria, France, Germany, the Netherlands, the UK and the USA," IMK Working Paper 03-2007, IMK at the Hans Boeckler Foundation, Macroeconomic Policy Institute.
    5. Eckhard Hein & Engelbert Stockhammer, 2010. "Macroeconomic Policy Mix, Employment and Inflation in a Post-Keynesian Alternative to the New Consensus Model," Review of Political Economy, Taylor & Francis Journals, pages 317-354.
    6. Eckhard Hein, 2012. "The Macroeconomics of Finance-Dominated Capitalism – and its Crisis," Books, Edward Elgar Publishing, number 14931, September.
    7. Asensio, Angel & Charles, Sébastien & Lang, Dany & Le Heron, Edwin, 2011. "Les développements récents de la macroéconomie post-keynésienne," Revue de la Régulation - Capitalisme, institutions, pouvoirs, Association Recherche et Régulation, vol. 10.
    8. Bruno Damásio & Diogo Martins, 2017. "Do Labour Market Reforms Pay Off? Unemployment and Capital Accumulation in Portugal," Working Papers Department of Economics 2017/01, ISEG - Lisbon School of Economics and Management, Department of Economics, Universidade de Lisboa.
    9. Angel Asensio, 2008. "(Post) Keynesian alternative to inflation targeting," Post-Print halshs-00335560, HAL.
    10. Eckhard Hein & Engelbert Stockhammer, 2010. "Macroeconomic Policy Mix, Employment and Inflation in a Post-Keynesian Alternative to the New Consensus Model," Review of Political Economy, Taylor & Francis Journals, pages 317-354.
    11. Hein, Eckhard, 2016. "Post-Keynesian macroeconomics since the mid-1990s: Main developments," IPE Working Papers 75/2016, Berlin School of Economics and Law, Institute for International Political Economy (IPE).
    12. Geoff C. Harcourt & Peter Kriesler & John Nevilet, 2013. "Why myths in neoclassical economics threaten the world economy: a post-Keynesian Manifesto," Discussion Papers 2013-36, School of Economics, The University of New South Wales.
    13. Nyorekwa, Enock Twinoburyo & Odhiambo, Nicholas Mbaya, 2016. "Can monetary policy drive economic growth? empirical evidence from Tanzania," Working Papers 21122, University of South Africa, Department of Economics.
    14. Eckhard Hein & Christian Schoder, 2011. "Interest rates, distribution and capital accumulation -- A post-Kaleckian perspective on the US and Germany," International Review of Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 25(6), pages 693-723, November.
    15. Canale, Rosaria Rita & Napolitano, Oreste, 2009. "The recessive attitude of EMU policies: reflections on the italian experience, 1998–2008," MPRA Paper 20207, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    16. Giuseppe Fontana & Malcolm Sawyer, 2014. "The Macroeconomics and Financial System Requirements for a Sustainable Future," Working papers wpaper53, Financialisation, Economy, Society & Sustainable Development (FESSUD) Project.
    17. Kai D. Schmid, 2010. "Medium-run macrodynamics and the consensus view of stabilization policy," Diskussionspapiere aus dem Institut für Volkswirtschaftslehre der Universität Hohenheim 322/2010, Department of Economics, University of Hohenheim, Germany.
    18. Elissa Braunstein, 2013. "Central bank policy and gender," Chapters,in: Handbook of Research on Gender and Economic Life, chapter 21, pages 345-358 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    19. Angel Asensio, 2012. "Between the Cup and the Lip: On Post Keynesian Interest Rate Rules and Long-term Interest Rate Management," Chapters,in: Monetary Policy and Central Banking, chapter 1 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    20. Mariano Beltrani & Juan Cuattromo, 2012. "Redefining Monetary Policy Limits: Towards an Expansion of its Role in Economic Development," Ensayos Económicos, Central Bank of Argentina, Economic Research Department, pages 121-168.
    21. Alfonso Palacio Vera, 2008. "Money wage rigidity, monopoly power and hysteresis," Documentos de trabajo de la Facultad de Ciencias Económicas y Empresariales 08-02, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Facultad de Ciencias Económicas y Empresariales.
    22. António Afonso & André Albuquerque, 2017. "Sovereign Credit Rating Mismatches," Working Papers Department of Economics 2017/02, ISEG - Lisbon School of Economics and Management, Department of Economics, Universidade de Lisboa.
    23. Canale, Rosaria Rita, 2008. "Central bank reaction to public deficit and sound public finance: the case of the European Monetary Union," MPRA Paper 8789, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    24. Eckhard Hein, 2017. "Post-Keynesian macroeconomics since the mid-1990s - main developments," FMM Working Paper 01-2017, IMK at the Hans Boeckler Foundation, Macroeconomic Policy Institute.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • E5 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit
    • E52 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Monetary Policy

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