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Multi-Agent Systems as a Tool for Analyzing Path-Dependent Macrodynamics

Author

Listed:
  • Mark Setterfield

    () (Department of Economics, New School for Social Research)

  • Shyam Gouri Suresh

    () (Department of Economics, Davidson College)

Abstract

This paper discusses the concept of path dependence in macrodynamics, and identifies practical difficulties associated with building path-dependent macrodynamic models of the sort that Keynesians and Schumpeterians regard as necessary for the successful study of long-term growth and development. It is suggested that multi-agent systems (MAS) analysis can help address these difficulties, and therefore provides a useful tool for advancing path-dependent macrodynamic analysis. An illustrative example is provided in the form of a MAS model of path-dependent aggregate fluctuations.

Suggested Citation

  • Mark Setterfield & Shyam Gouri Suresh, 2014. "Multi-Agent Systems as a Tool for Analyzing Path-Dependent Macrodynamics," Working Papers 1405, New School for Social Research, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:new:wpaper:1405
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    File URL: http://www.economicpolicyresearch.org/econ/2014/NSSR_WP_052014.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Mario Cimoli & Jose Antonio Ocampo & Gabriel Porcile, 2017. "Choosing sides in the trilemma: international financial cycles and structural change in developing economies," LEM Papers Series 2017/26, Laboratory of Economics and Management (LEM), Sant'Anna School of Advanced Studies, Pisa, Italy.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Multi-agent systems; agent based models; path dependence; macrodynamics;

    JEL classification:

    • B41 - Schools of Economic Thought and Methodology - - Economic Methodology - - - Economic Methodology
    • C63 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Mathematical Methods; Programming Models; Mathematical and Simulation Modeling - - - Computational Techniques
    • E12 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - General Aggregative Models - - - Keynes; Keynesian; Post-Keynesian
    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles
    • E37 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Forecasting and Simulation: Models and Applications
    • O41 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - One, Two, and Multisector Growth Models

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