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Engendering Foreign Direct Investment: Family Structure, Labor Markets and International Capital Mobility

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  • Braunstein, Elissa

Abstract

In this paper I develop a theoretical foundation for analyzing how gender roles in the household affect foreign direct investment in a developing country context. It is argued that the extent to which women and men share the costs of social reproduction at the household level is a central determinant of women’s labor supply and the profitability of investment. I combine a model of family structure with a structuralist macromodel to investigate the effects of various public policies on women’s wages and employment. A major goal is to specify the constraints imposed by international capital mobility on the prospects for increased equality and living standards for women. Published in World Development, July 2000, 28(7): 1157-72.
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  • Braunstein, Elissa, 2000. "Engendering Foreign Direct Investment: Family Structure, Labor Markets and International Capital Mobility," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 28(7), pages 1157-1172, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:wdevel:v:28:y:2000:i:7:p:1157-1172
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    1. Aitken, Brian & Harrison, Ann & Lipsey, Robert E., 1996. "Wages and foreign ownership A comparative study of Mexico, Venezuela, and the United States," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, pages 345-371.
    2. Gerald Epstein & Elissa Braunstein, 1999. "Creating International Credit Rules and the Multilateral Agreement on Investment: What are the Alternatives?," Published Studies ps4, Political Economy Research Institute, University of Massachusetts at Amherst.
    3. Blecker, Robert A, 1989. "International Competition, Income Distribution and Economic Growth," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 13(3), pages 395-412, September.
    4. Aitken, Brian & Harrison, Ann & Lipsey, Robert E., 1996. "Wages and foreign ownership A comparative study of Mexico, Venezuela, and the United States," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, pages 345-371.
    5. Stephanie Seguino, 1997. "Gender wage inequality and export-led growth in South Korea," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, pages 102-132.
    6. Robert E. Lipsey, 1998. "Internationalized Production in Developed and Developing Countries and in Industry Sectors," NBER Working Papers 6405, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    7. Standing, Guy, 1989. "Global feminization through flexible labor," World Development, Elsevier, pages 1077-1095.
    8. Epstein,Gerald A. & Gintis,Herbert M., 2011. "Macroeconomic Policy after the Conservative Era," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521148412, December.
    9. Robert E. Lipsey, 1999. "The Location and Characteristics of U.S. Affiliates in Asia," NBER Working Papers 6876, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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    Cited by:

    1. Saul Estrin & Tomasz Mickiewicz, 2011. "Institutions and female entrepreneurship," Small Business Economics, Springer, pages 397-415.
    2. Stephanie Seguino, 2000. "Accounting for Gender in Asian Economic Growth," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, pages 27-58.
    3. Stephanie Seguino & Caren Grown, 2006. "Gender equity and globalization: macroeconomic policy for developing countries," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., pages 1081-1104.
    4. Bruce Fallick & Charles A. Fleischman & James B. Rebitzer, 2006. "Job-Hopping in Silicon Valley: Some Evidence Concerning the Microfoundations of a High-Technology Cluster," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, pages 472-481.
    5. Greg Hannsgen, 2007. "A Random Walk Down Maple Lane? A Critique of Neoclassical Consumption Theory with Reference to Housing Wealth," Review of Political Economy, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 19(1), pages 1-20.
    6. James Crotty, 2009. "Structural causes of the global financial crisis: a critical assessment of the 'new financial architecture'," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, pages 563-580.
    7. Michael Fertig & Marcus Tamm, 2010. "Always Poor or Never Poor and Nothing in Between? Duration of Child Poverty in Germany," German Economic Review, Verein für Socialpolitik, vol. 11, pages 150-168, May.
    8. Andrew Morrison & Shwetlena Sabarwal, 2008. "The Economic Participation of Adolescent Girls and Young Women : Why Does It Matter?," World Bank Other Operational Studies 11131, The World Bank.
    9. Stephanie Seguino, 2013. "From micro-level gender relations to the macro economy and back again," Chapters,in: Handbook of Research on Gender and Economic Life, chapter 20, pages 325-344 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    10. Marie W. Arneberg & John K. Dagsvik & Zhiyang Jia, 2002. "Labor Market Modeling Recognizing Latent Job Attributes and Opportunity Constraints An Empirical Analysis of Labor Market Behavior of Eritrean Women," Discussion Papers 331, Statistics Norway, Research Department.
    11. van Staveren, I.P., 2002. "Towards monitoring mutual trade-gender links," ISS Working Papers - General Series 19102, International Institute of Social Studies of Erasmus University Rotterdam (ISS), The Hague.
    12. Betül Gür, 2016. "An Analysis of the Relationship Between Foreign Direct Investment and Sociopolitical Factors via the Use of Panel Regression," Eurasian Eononometrics, Statistics and Emprical Economics Journal, Eurasian Academy Of Sciences, vol. 3(3), pages 43-55, January.

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