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Feminist-Kaleckian Macroeconomic Policy for Developing Countries

  • Stephanie Seguino
  • Caren A. Grown

This paper reviews evidence of the gender effects of globalization in developing economies. It then outlines a set of macroeconomic and trade policies to promote gender equity. The evidence suggests that while liberalization has expanded women's access to employment, the long-term goal of transforming gender inequalities remains unmet and appears unattainable without state intervention in markets. This paper sets forth some general principles that can produce greater gender equality, premised on shifting from economies that are profit led and export oriented to those that are wage led and full-employment oriented. The framework is Kaleckian in its focus on the relationship between the gender distribution of income and macroeconomic outcomes.

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File URL: http://www.levyinstitute.org/pubs/wp_446.pdf
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Paper provided by Levy Economics Institute in its series Economics Working Paper Archive with number wp_446.

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Date of creation: May 2006
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Handle: RePEc:lev:wrkpap:wp_446
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.levyinstitute.org

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  1. Seguino, Stephanie, 1999. "The Investment Function Revisited: Disciplining Capital in Korea," MPRA Paper 6539, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  2. Newman, Constance & Jarvis, Lovell S., 2000. "Worker And Firm Determinants Of Piece Rate Variation In An Agricultural Labor Market," Working Papers 11977, University of California, Davis, Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics.
  3. Bhaduri, Amit & Marglin, Stephen, 1990. "Unemployment and the Real Wage: The Economic Basis for Contesting Political Ideologies," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 14(4), pages 375-93, December.
  4. Oostendorp, Remco, 2004. "Globalization and the gender wage gap," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3256, The World Bank.
  5. Floro, Maria Sagrario, 1995. "Economic restructuring, gender and the allocation of time," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 23(11), pages 1913-1929, November.
  6. Simon Appleton, 1996. "The gender wage gap in three African countries," Economics Series Working Papers WPS/1996-07, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
  7. Huff, W G, 1995. "What Is the Singapore Model of Economic Development?," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 19(6), pages 735-59, December.
  8. Erturk, Korkut & Darity, William Jr., 2000. "Secular Changes in the Gender Composition of Employment and Growth Dynamics in the North and the South," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 28(7), pages 1231-1238, July.
  9. Elissa Braunstein, 2000. "Engendering Foreign Direct Investment: Family Structure, Labor Markets, and International Capital Mobility," Published Studies ps10, Political Economy Research Institute, University of Massachusetts at Amherst.
  10. G¸nseli Berik & Yana van der Meulen Rodgers & Joseph E. Zveglich, 2004. "International Trade and Gender Wage Discrimination: Evidence from East Asia," Review of Development Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 8(2), pages 237-254, 05.
  11. Tzannatos, Zafiris, 1999. "Women and Labor Market Changes in the Global Economy: Growth Helps, Inequalities Hurt and Public Policy Matters," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 27(3), pages 551-569, March.
  12. Rama, Martin, 1996. "The consequences of doubling the minimum wage : the case of Indonesia," Policy Research Working Paper Series 1643, The World Bank.
  13. M. Anne Hill & Elizabeth King, 1995. "Women's education and economic well-being," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 1(2), pages 21-46.
  14. Stephanie Seguino, 1997. "Gender wage inequality and export-led growth in South Korea," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 34(2), pages 102-132.
  15. Erturk, Korkut & Cagatay, Nilufer, 1995. "Macroeconomic consequences of cyclical and secular changes in feminization: An experiment at gendered macromodeling," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 23(11), pages 1969-1977, November.
  16. Standing, Guy, 1989. "Global feminization through flexible labor," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 17(7), pages 1077-1095, July.
  17. Asad Sayeed & Radhika Balakrishnan, 2002. "Why Do Firms Disintegrate? Towards an Understanding of the Firm Level Decision to Sub-Contract and Its Impact on Labor," SCEPA working paper series. SCEPA's main areas of research are macroeconomic policy, inequality and poverty, and globalization. 2002-12, Schwartz Center for Economic Policy Analysis (SCEPA), The New School.
  18. Sandra E. Black & Elizabeth Brainerd, 1999. "Importing equality? The effects of increased competition on the gender wage gap," Staff Reports 74, Federal Reserve Bank of New York.
  19. Antecol, Heather, 2000. "An examination of cross-country differences in the gender gap in labor force participation rates," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 7(4), pages 409-426, July.
  20. Blecker, Robert A & Seguino, Stephanie, 2002. "Macroeconomic Effects of Reducing Gender Wage Inequality in an Export-Oriented, Semi-industrialized Economy," Review of Development Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 6(1), pages 103-19, February.
  21. Ozler, Sule, 2000. "Export Orientation and Female Share of Employment: Evidence from Turkey," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 28(7), pages 1239-1248, July.
  22. C. Mark Blackden, 1999. "Gender, Growth, and Poverty Reduction," World Bank Other Operational Studies 9873, The World Bank.
  23. Robert Pollin, 2002. "Globalization and the Transition to Egalitarian Development," Working Papers wp42, Political Economy Research Institute, University of Massachusetts at Amherst.
  24. Mehra, Rekha & Gammage, Sarah, 1999. "Trends, Countertrends, and Gaps in Women's Employment," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 27(3), pages 533-550, March.
  25. Darity, William Jr., 1995. "The formal structure of a gender-segregated low-income economy," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 23(11), pages 1963-1968, November.
  26. Seguino, Stephanie, 2003. "Why are women in the Caribbean so much more likely than men to be unemployed?," MPRA Paper 6507, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  27. Elson, Diane & Cagatay, Nilufer, 2000. "The Social Content of Macroeconomic Policies," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 28(7), pages 1347-1364, July.
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