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Caren Grown

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First Name:Caren
Middle Name:
Last Name:Grown
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RePEc Short-ID:pgr222
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Affiliation

Department of Economics
American University

Washington, District of Columbia (United States)
http://www.american.edu/cas/economics/

: (202)885-3770

4400 Massachusetts Ave., NW, Washington, DC, 20016-8029
RePEc:edi:deameus (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

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Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Doss, Cheryl & Grown, Caren & Deere, Carmen Diana, 2011. "Gender and asset ownership : a guide to collecting individual-level data," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4704, The World Bank.
  2. Caren Grown & Emcet Tas, 2010. "Gender Equality in the US Labor Markets in the "Great Recession" of 2007-2010," Working Papers 2010-15, American University, Department of Economics.
  3. Stephanie Seguino & Caren A. Grown, 2006. "Feminist-Kaleckian Macroeconomic Policy for Developing Countries," Economics Working Paper Archive wp_446, Levy Economics Institute.
  4. Caren A. Grown, 2006. "Quick Impact Initiatives For Gender Equality: A Menu of Options," Economics Working Paper Archive wp_462, Levy Economics Institute.
  5. Seguino, Stephanie & Grown, Caren, 2006. "Gender equity and globalization: Macroeconomic policy for developing countries," MPRA Paper 6540, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  6. Caren A. Grown & Chandrika Bahadur & Jessie Handbury & Diane Elson, 2006. "The Financial Requirements of Achieving Gender Equality and Women's Empowerment," Economics Working Paper Archive wp_467, Levy Economics Institute.
  7. Timothy Bates & Caren Grown, 1991. "Commercial Bank Lending Practices And The Development Of Black-Owned Construction Companies," Working Papers 91-9, Center for Economic Studies, U.S. Census Bureau.

Articles

  1. Caren Grown, 2011. "The Development Economics Reader," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 17(1), pages 170-173, January.
  2. Caren Grown, 2010. "Economics, Assets and Empowerment," Development, Palgrave Macmillan;Society for International Deveopment, vol. 53(2), pages 168-171, June.
  3. Caren Grown & Maria Floro & Diane Elson, 2010. "Guest Editors' Note," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 16(3), pages 1-3.
  4. Caren Grown, 2007. "Gender equality: striving for justice in an unequal world / Progress of the World's Women 2005: Women, Work, and Poverty / The World's Women 2005: Progress in Statistics," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 13(2), pages 203-207.
  5. Stephanie Seguino & Caren Grown, 2006. "Gender equity and globalization: macroeconomic policy for developing countries," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 18(8), pages 1081-1104.
  6. Caren Grown, 2005. "Answering the Skeptics: Achieving gender equality and the Millennium Development Goals1," Development, Palgrave Macmillan;Society for International Deveopment, vol. 48(3), pages 82-86, September.
  7. Caren Grown, 2005. "Trade Liberalization and Reproductive Health: A framework for understanding the linkages," Development, Palgrave Macmillan;Society for International Deveopment, vol. 48(4), pages 28-42, December.
  8. Lourdes BenerIa & Maria Floro & Caren Grown & Martha MacDonald, 2000. "Introduction: Globalization and Gender," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 6(3), pages 7-18.
  9. Grown, Caren & Elson, Diane & Cagatay, Nilufer, 2000. "Introduction," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 28(7), pages 1145-1156, July.
  10. Grown, Caren A. & Sebstad, Jennefer, 1989. "Introduction: Toward a wider perspective on women's employment," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 17(7), pages 937-952, July.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Doss, Cheryl & Grown, Caren & Deere, Carmen Diana, 2011. "Gender and asset ownership : a guide to collecting individual-level data," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4704, The World Bank.

    Cited by:

    1. Sumon Kumar Bhaumik & Ralitza Dimova & Ira N. Gang, 2015. "Is women's ownership of land a panacea in developing countries? Evidence from land-owning farm households in Malawi," Departmental Working Papers 201521, Rutgers University, Department of Economics.
    2. Paris, Thelma & Pede, Valerien & Luis, Joyce & Sharma, Raman & Singh, Abha & Stipular, Jeffrey & Villanueva, Donald, 2015. "Understanding men’s and women’s access to and control of assets and the implications for agricultural development projects: A case study in rice-farming households in eastern Uttar Pradesh, India:," IFPRI discussion papers 1437, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    3. Meinzen-Dick, Ruth Suseela & Johnson, Nancy & Quisumbing, Agnes R. & Njuki, Jemimah & Behrman, Julia A. & Rubin, Deborah & Peterman, Amber & Waithanji, Elizabeth, 2011. "Gender, assets, and agricultural development programs: A conceptual framework:," CAPRi working papers 99, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    4. Namonje-Kapembwa, Thelma & Thelma, Antony, 2016. "Improved Agricultural Technology Adoption in Zambia: Are Women Farmers Being Left Behind?," Food Security Collaborative Working Papers 245916, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
    5. Pradhan, Rajendra & Meinzen-Dick, Ruth Suseela & Theis, Sophie, 2018. "Property rights, intersectionality, and women’s empowerment in Nepal:," IFPRI discussion papers 1702, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    6. Alison Shaw & Patti Kristjanson, 2014. "A Catalyst toward Sustainability? Exploring Social Learning and Social Differentiation Approaches with the Agricultural Poor," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 6(5), pages 1-33, May.
    7. Madhav Prasad Dahal, 2017. "Do Female Education and Ownership of Asset Matter for Poverty Reduction in Nepal?," Journal of Development Innovations, KarmaQuest Internatioinal, vol. 1, pages 58-85, October.
    8. Meinzen-Dick, Ruth & Quisumbing, Agnes & Behrman, Julia & Biermayr-Jenzano, Patricia & Wilde, Vicki & Noordeloos, Marco & Ragasa, Catherine & Beintema, Nienke, 2010. "Engendering agricultural research," IFPRI discussion papers 973, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    9. Baruah, Bipasha, 2010. "Women and Landed Property in Urban India: Negotiating Closed Doors and Windows of Opportunity," WIDER Working Paper Series 056, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    10. Mary Eschelbach Hansen & Julie Routzahn, 2014. "Gender Differences in Attitudes Toward Debt and Financial Position: The Impact of the Great Recession," Working Papers 2014-10, American University, Department of Economics.
    11. Hillenbrand, E. & Karim, N. & Mohanraj, P. & Wu, D., 2015. "Measuring gender-transformative change: A review of literature and promising practices," Working Papers, The WorldFish Center, number 40647, September.
    12. Johnson, Nancy & Njuki, Jemimah & Waithanji, Elizabeth & Nhambeto, Marinho & Rogers, Martha & Kruger, Elizabeth Hutchinson, 2013. "The gendered impacts of agricultural asset transfer projects: Lessons from the Manica Smallholder Dairy Development Program:," CAPRi working papers 115, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).

  2. Caren Grown & Emcet Tas, 2010. "Gender Equality in the US Labor Markets in the "Great Recession" of 2007-2010," Working Papers 2010-15, American University, Department of Economics.

    Cited by:

    1. Tas, Emcet O. & Reimao, Maira Emy & Orlando, Maria Beatriz, 2013. "Gender, ethnicity and cumulative disadvantage in education : evidence from Latin American and African censuses," Policy Research Working Paper Series 6734, The World Bank.
    2. Valeria Cirillo & Marcella Corsi & Carlo D'Ippoliti, 2015. "Gender, class and the crisis," Working Papers CEB 15-026, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles.
    3. Martha Starr, 2014. "Gender, added-worker effects, and the 2007–2009 recession: Looking within the household," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 12(2), pages 209-235, June.
    4. Elissa Braunstein, 2013. "Central bank policy and gender," Chapters,in: Handbook of Research on Gender and Economic Life, chapter 21, pages 345-358 Edward Elgar Publishing.

  3. Stephanie Seguino & Caren A. Grown, 2006. "Feminist-Kaleckian Macroeconomic Policy for Developing Countries," Economics Working Paper Archive wp_446, Levy Economics Institute.

    Cited by:

    1. Stephanie Seguino, 2005. "Gender Inequality in a Globalizing World," Industrial Organization 0507005, EconWPA.
    2. Pavlina R. Tcherneva, 2012. "What Do Poor Women Want? Public Employment or Cash Transfers? Lessons from Argentina," Economics Working Paper Archive wp_705, Levy Economics Institute.
    3. Caren A. Grown & Chandrika Bahadur & Jessie Handbury & Diane Elson, 2006. "The Financial Requirements of Achieving Gender Equality and Women's Empowerment," Economics Working Paper Archive wp_467, Levy Economics Institute.
    4. Dasgupta, Sukti. & Sudarshan, Ratna M., 2011. "Issues in labour market inequality and women's participation in India's National Rural Employment Guarantee Programme," ILO Working Papers 994617143402676, International Labour Organization.
    5. Cagatay, Nilüfer. & Ertürk, Korkuk., 2004. "Gender and globalization : a macroeconomic perspective," ILO Working Papers 993709743402676, International Labour Organization.

  4. Caren A. Grown, 2006. "Quick Impact Initiatives For Gender Equality: A Menu of Options," Economics Working Paper Archive wp_462, Levy Economics Institute.

    Cited by:

    1. Pavlina R. Tcherneva, 2012. "What Do Poor Women Want? Public Employment or Cash Transfers? Lessons from Argentina," Economics Working Paper Archive wp_705, Levy Economics Institute.

  5. Seguino, Stephanie & Grown, Caren, 2006. "Gender equity and globalization: Macroeconomic policy for developing countries," MPRA Paper 6540, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    Cited by:

    1. Audi, Marc & Ali, Amjad, 2016. "Gender Gap and Trade Liberalization: An Analysis of some selected SAARC countries," MPRA Paper 83520, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Majid, H. & Siegmann, K.A., 2017. "Has growth been good for women’s employment in Pakistan?," ISS Working Papers - General Series 630, International Institute of Social Studies of Erasmus University Rotterdam (ISS), The Hague.
    3. Elisa Gamberoni & José Guilherme Reis, 2011. "Gender-Informing Aid for Trade : Entry Points and Initial Lessons Learned from the World Bank," World Bank Other Operational Studies 10086, The World Bank.
    4. Vincent Carpentier & Elaine Unterhalter, 2011. "Globalization, Higher Education and Inequalities: Problems and Prospects," Chapters,in: Handbook on Globalization and Higher Education, chapter 9 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    5. M. Najeeb Shafiq, 2009. "A reversal of educational fortune? Educational gender gaps in Bangladesh," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 21(1), pages 137-155.
    6. Siegmann, K.A. & Majid, H., 2014. "Empowering growth in Pakistan?," ISS Working Papers - General Series 595, International Institute of Social Studies of Erasmus University Rotterdam (ISS), The Hague.
    7. Stephanie Seguino, 2008. "Gender, Distribution, and Balance of Payments (revised 10/08)," Working Papers wp133_revised, Political Economy Research Institute, University of Massachusetts at Amherst.
    8. Günseli Berik & Yana Van Der Meulen Rodgers, 2010. "Options for enforcing labour standards: Lessons from Bangladesh And Cambodia," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 22(1), pages 56-85.
    9. Menon, Nidhiya & Rodgers, Yana van der Meulen, 2009. "International Trade and the Gender Wage Gap: New Evidence from India's Manufacturing Sector," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 37(5), pages 965-981, May.
    10. Kang, Lili & Peng, Fei, 2012. "Siblings, public facilities and education returns in China," MPRA Paper 38922, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    11. Marina Durano & Nicole Bidegain Ponte, 2016. "A Feminist Perspective on the Follow-Up Process for Financing for Development," Development, Palgrave Macmillan;Society for International Deveopment, vol. 59(1), pages 32-39, June.

  6. Caren A. Grown & Chandrika Bahadur & Jessie Handbury & Diane Elson, 2006. "The Financial Requirements of Achieving Gender Equality and Women's Empowerment," Economics Working Paper Archive wp_467, Levy Economics Institute.

    Cited by:

    1. Ashwani Saith, 2006. "Forum 2006," Development and Change, International Institute of Social Studies, vol. 37(6), pages 1167-1199, November.
    2. Manisha Desai, 2010. "Hope in Hard Times: Women’s Empowerment and Human Development," Human Development Research Papers (2009 to present) HDRP-2010-14, Human Development Report Office (HDRO), United Nations Development Programme (UNDP).
    3. Caren A. Grown, 2006. "Quick Impact Initiatives For Gender Equality: A Menu of Options," Economics Working Paper Archive wp_462, Levy Economics Institute.
    4. Elaine Unterhalter & Amy North, 2013. "Girls’ schooling and the global education and development agenda," Chapters,in: Handbook of Research on Gender and Economic Life, chapter 25, pages 410-420 Edward Elgar Publishing.

  7. Timothy Bates & Caren Grown, 1991. "Commercial Bank Lending Practices And The Development Of Black-Owned Construction Companies," Working Papers 91-9, Center for Economic Studies, U.S. Census Bureau.

    Cited by:

    1. Harry Holzer & David Neumark, 1999. "Assessing Affirmative Action," NBER Working Papers 7323, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Price, Gregory N., 1995. "The determinants of entry for black-owned commercial banks," The Quarterly Review of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 35(3), pages 289-303.
    3. Brian Headd, 1999. "The Characteristics of Business Owners Database, 1992," Working Papers 99-8, Center for Economic Studies, U.S. Census Bureau.
    4. Thomas Åstbro & Irwin Bernhardt, 2005. "The Winner’s Curse of Human Capital," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 24(1), pages 63-78, February.
    5. Bates, Timothy, 1995. "Self-employment entry across industry groups," Journal of Business Venturing, Elsevier, vol. 10(2), pages 143-156, March.
    6. Boyd, Robert L., 2008. "Trends in the occupations of eminent black entrepreneurs in the United States," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 37(6), pages 2390-2398, December.
    7. Alfred R Nucci, 1992. "The Characteristics of Business Owners Database," Working Papers 92-7, Center for Economic Studies, U.S. Census Bureau.
    8. Timothy Bates & Darrell Williams, 1995. "Preferential Procurement Programs Do Not Necessarily Help Minority-Owned Business," Working Papers 95-1, Center for Economic Studies, U.S. Census Bureau.
    9. Dahlin, Kristina & Taylor, Margaret & Fichman, Mark, 2004. "Today's Edisons or weekend hobbyists: technical merit and success of inventions by independent inventors," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 33(8), pages 1167-1183, October.
    10. Thomas Astebro & I. Bernhardt, 2005. "The Winner's Curse of Human Capital," Post-Print hal-00476901, HAL.

Articles

  1. Stephanie Seguino & Caren Grown, 2006. "Gender equity and globalization: macroeconomic policy for developing countries," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 18(8), pages 1081-1104.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  2. Caren Grown, 2005. "Answering the Skeptics: Achieving gender equality and the Millennium Development Goals1," Development, Palgrave Macmillan;Society for International Deveopment, vol. 48(3), pages 82-86, September.

    Cited by:

    1. Adekunle, Ademola & Osazuwa, Peter & Raghavan, Vijaya, 2016. "Socio-economic determinants of agricultural mechanisation in Africa: A research note based on cassava cultivation mechanisation," Technological Forecasting and Social Change, Elsevier, vol. 112(C), pages 313-319.

  3. Caren Grown, 2005. "Trade Liberalization and Reproductive Health: A framework for understanding the linkages," Development, Palgrave Macmillan;Society for International Deveopment, vol. 48(4), pages 28-42, December.

    Cited by:

    1. McNamara, Courtney, 2017. "Trade liberalization and social determinants of health: A state of the literature review," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 176(C), pages 1-13.
    2. Bussmann, Margit, 2009. "The Effect of Trade Openness on Women's Welfare and Work Life," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 37(6), pages 1027-1038, June.
    3. Banga, Rashmi & Bansal, Renu, 2009. "Impact of trade in services on gender employment in India," MPRA Paper 35071, University Library of Munich, Germany.

  4. Lourdes BenerIa & Maria Floro & Caren Grown & Martha MacDonald, 2000. "Introduction: Globalization and Gender," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 6(3), pages 7-18.

    Cited by:

    1. Suwastika Naidu, 2016. "Does Human Development Influence Women’s Labour Force Participation Rate? Evidences from the Fiji Islands," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 127(3), pages 1067-1084, July.
    2. Baslevent, Cem & Onaran, Ozlem, 2004. "The Effect of Export-Oriented Growth on Female Labor Market Outcomes in Turkey," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 32(8), pages 1375-1393, August.

  5. Grown, Caren & Elson, Diane & Cagatay, Nilufer, 2000. "Introduction," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 28(7), pages 1145-1156, July.

    Cited by:

    1. van Staveren, I.P., 2005. "Five methodological approaches for research on gender and trade impacts," ISS Working Papers - General Series 19176, International Institute of Social Studies of Erasmus University Rotterdam (ISS), The Hague.
    2. Suzanne Bergeron, 2013. "International development institutions, gender and economic life," Chapters,in: Handbook of Research on Gender and Economic Life, chapter 8, pages 113-131 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    3. Basu, Kaushik, 2001. "Gender and Say: A Model of Household Behavior with Endogenously-Determined Balance of Power," Working Papers 01-01, Cornell University, Center for Analytic Economics.
    4. Mamgain, Rajendra P., 2004. "Employment, migration and livelihoods in the Hill Economy of Uttaranchal," MPRA Paper 32303, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    5. Samuel Nii Ardey Codjoe, 2010. "Population and food crop production in male- and female-headed households in Ghana," International Journal of Development Issues, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 9(1), pages 68-85, April.
    6. Antonopoulos, Rania., 2009. "The unpaid care work : paid work connection," ILO Working Papers 994274043402676, International Labour Organization.
    7. B. P., Asalatha, 2009. "Women’s Development and Development Discourse," MPRA Paper 43934, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised Jun 2009.
    8. Lucy Ferguson, 2009. "Analysing the Gender Dimensions of Tourism as a Development Strategy," Policy Papers del Instituto Complutense de Estudios Internacionales 09-03, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Instituto Complutense de Estudios Internacionales.
    9. A. Dijkstra, 2002. "Revisiting UNDP's GDI and GEM: Towards an Alternative," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 57(3), pages 301-338, March.
    10. Stephanie Seguino, 2013. "From micro-level gender relations to the macro economy and back again," Chapters,in: Handbook of Research on Gender and Economic Life, chapter 20, pages 325-344 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    11. Thorin, Maria, 2003. "The gender dimension of economic globalization: an annotated bibliography," Manuales 28, Naciones Unidas Comisión Económica para América Latina y el Caribe (CEPAL).
    12. van Staveren, I.P., 2002. "Towards monitoring mutual trade-gender links," ISS Working Papers - General Series 19102, International Institute of Social Studies of Erasmus University Rotterdam (ISS), The Hague.
    13. Simel Esim & Eileen Kuttab, 2002. "Women's Informal Employment in Palestine: Securing A Livelihood Against All Odds," Working Papers 0213, Economic Research Forum, revised 02 May 2002.
    14. Tarp, Finn & Arndt, Channing & Jensen, Henning Tarp & Robinson, Sherman & Heltberg, Rasmus, 2002. "Facing the development challenge in Mozambique: an economywide perspective," Research reports 126, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    15. Cagatay, Nilüfer. & Ertürk, Korkuk., 2004. "Gender and globalization : a macroeconomic perspective," ILO Working Papers 993709743402676, International Labour Organization.
    16. Yumiko Sano, 1998. "Un modelo multi-elección del empleo formal e informal de mujeres en Lima, Perú," Apuntes. Revista de ciencias sociales, Fondo Editorial, Universidad del Pacífico, vol. 25(42), pages 107-139.
    17. Maria S. Floro, 2012. "The Crises of Environment and Social Reproduction: Understanding their Linkages," Working Papers 2012-04, American University, Department of Economics.

  6. Grown, Caren A. & Sebstad, Jennefer, 1989. "Introduction: Toward a wider perspective on women's employment," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 17(7), pages 937-952, July.

    Cited by:

    1. Carla Sutherland, 2000. "Securing the future: student financing at Makerere University, Uganda," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 12(4), pages 549-558.
    2. Mayoux, Linda., 2001. "Jobs, gender and small enterprises : getting the policy environment right," ILO Working Papers 993467093402676, International Labour Organization.
    3. Malhotra, Anju & DeGraff, Deborah S., 1997. "Entry versus success in the labor force: Young women's employment in Sri Lanka," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 25(3), pages 379-394, March.
    4. Cathy Farnworth, 2009. "Well-Being is a Process of Becoming: Respondent-Led Research With Organic Farmers in Madagascar," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 90(1), pages 89-106, January.
    5. Jo Beall, 2000. "From the culture of poverty to inclusive cities: re-framing urban policy and politics," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 12(6), pages 843-856.

More information

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Statistics

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Co-authorship network on CollEc

Featured entries

This author is featured on the following reading lists, publication compilations or Wikipedia entries:
  1. Bangladesh related Economists

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 4 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-PKE: Post Keynesian Economics (2) 2006-06-24 2006-08-26
  2. NEP-DEV: Development (1) 2008-09-13
  3. NEP-KNM: Knowledge Management & Knowledge Economy (1) 2008-09-13
  4. NEP-MAC: Macroeconomics (1) 2006-06-24
  5. NEP-SEA: South East Asia (1) 2006-06-24

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