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Gender, Ethnicity, and Cumulative Disadvantage in Education Outcomes

Author

Listed:
  • Taş, Emcet O.
  • Reimão, Maira Emy
  • Orlando, Maria Beatriz

Abstract

This paper studies the impact of gender and ethnicity on educational outcomes in Bolivia, Mexico, Peru, Senegal, and Sierra Leone, using the Integrated Public Use Microdata Series-International (IPUMS-I) database. Using an estimation method analogous to difference-in-differences, the paper finds that gender-based differences in literacy, primary school completion, and secondary school completion are larger for minority ethnic groups compared to others, or ethnicity-based differences are larger for women compared to men. The findings suggest that the intersection of gender and ethnicity confers cumulative disadvantage for minority groups, especially in Latin American countries, with implications on the design of development programs.

Suggested Citation

  • Taş, Emcet O. & Reimão, Maira Emy & Orlando, Maria Beatriz, 2014. "Gender, Ethnicity, and Cumulative Disadvantage in Education Outcomes," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 64(C), pages 538-553.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:wdevel:v:64:y:2014:i:c:p:538-553
    DOI: 10.1016/j.worlddev.2014.06.036
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Pasquier-Doumer, Laure & Risso Brandon, Fiorella, 2015. "Aspiration Failure: A Poverty Trap for Indigenous Children in Peru?," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 72(C), pages 208-223.
    2. Battaglia, Marianna & Lebedinski, Lara, 2015. "Equal Access to Education: An Evaluation of the Roma Teaching Assistant Program in Serbia," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 76(C), pages 62-81.
    3. repec:bla:afrdev:v:29:y:2017:i:1:p:81-91 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. repec:eee:injoed:v:65:y:2019:i:c:p:10-25 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. repec:kap:jecinq:v:16:y:2018:i:3:d:10.1007_s10888-017-9373-7 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Maira Emy Reimão & Emcet O. Taş, 2017. "Gender Education Gaps among Indigenous and Non-Indigenous Groups in Bolivia," Development and Change, International Institute of Social Studies, vol. 48(2), pages 228-262, March.
    7. repec:eee:ecoedu:v:65:y:2018:i:c:p:126-137 is not listed on IDEAS
    8. Elin Vimefall & Daniela Andrén & Jörgen Levin, 2017. "Ethnolinguistic Background and Enrollment in Primary Education: Evidence from Kenya," African Development Review, African Development Bank, vol. 29(1), pages 81-91, March.
    9. repec:spr:joecin:v:16:y:2018:i:3:d:10.1007_s10888-017-9373-7 is not listed on IDEAS

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    Keywords

    gender; ethnicity; education; Latin America; Africa;

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