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The Complexities and Potential of Theorizing Gender, Caste, Race, and Class


  • Rose Brewer
  • Cecilia Conrad
  • Mary King


Most economists have not yet grappled with the demands of intersectional scholarship, which recognizes the intertwined nature of gender, race, class, caste and other influences on the economic situation of individuals and groups. Among economists, feminist economists may have made the most progress and be best positioned to break further ground, though we can do better and much remains to be done. This article synthesizes the case for intersectional work, reviews the state of the economic literature, describes the contributions of the articles in this special issue of Feminist Economics on "gender, color, caste and class," and sketches directions for the future.

Suggested Citation

  • Rose Brewer & Cecilia Conrad & Mary King, 2002. "The Complexities and Potential of Theorizing Gender, Caste, Race, and Class," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 8(2), pages 3-17.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:femeco:v:8:y:2002:i:2:p:3-17 DOI: 10.1080/1354570022000019038

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Humphries, Jane, 1977. "Class Struggle and the Persistence of the Working-Class Family," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 1(3), pages 241-258, September.
    2. George A. Akerlof & Rachel E. Kranton, 2000. "Economics and Identity," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 115(3), pages 715-753.
    3. Mary Corcoran & Greg J. Duncan, 1979. "Work History, Labor Force Attachment, and Earnings Differences between the Races and Sexes," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 14(1), pages 3-20.
    4. Jane Lapidus & Deborah Figart, 1998. "Remedying "Unfair Acts": U.S. Pay Equity by Race and Gender," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 4(3), pages 7-28.
    5. Neal, Derek A & Johnson, William R, 1996. "The Role of Premarket Factors in Black-White Wage Differences," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 104(5), pages 869-895, October.
    6. Patrick L. Mason, 2001. "Annual Income and Identity Formation among Persons of Mexican Descent," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 91(2), pages 178-183, May.
    7. Marlene Kim, 1997. "Poor Women Survey Poor Women: Feminist Perspectives in Survey Research," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 3(2), pages 99-117.
    8. Barbara Jones, 1985. "Black women and labor force participation: An analysis of sluggish growth rates," The Review of Black Political Economy, Springer;National Economic Association, vol. 14(2), pages 11-31, December.
    9. Beneria, Lourdes, 1979. "Reproduction, Production and the Sexual Division of Labour," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 3(3), pages 203-225, September.
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    Cited by:

    1. Taş, Emcet O. & Reimão, Maira Emy & Orlando, Maria Beatriz, 2014. "Gender, Ethnicity, and Cumulative Disadvantage in Education Outcomes," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 64(C), pages 538-553.
    2. Kruks-Wisner, Gabrielle, 2011. "Seeking the Local State: Gender, Caste, and the Pursuit of Public Services in Post-Tsunami India," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 39(7), pages 1143-1154, July.
    3. Marlene Kim, 2013. "Race and ethnicity in the workplace," Chapters,in: Handbook of Research on Gender and Economic Life, chapter 14, pages 218-235 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    4. Marilyn Power, 2013. "A social provisioning approach to gender and economic life," Chapters,in: Handbook of Research on Gender and Economic Life, chapter 1, pages 7-17 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    5. Maira Emy Reimão & Emcet O. Taş, 2017. "Gender Education Gaps among Indigenous and Non-Indigenous Groups in Bolivia," Development and Change, International Institute of Social Studies, vol. 48(2), pages 228-262, March.
    6. Forbes, Kinisha., 2011. "Inequality in crisis and recovery : revealing the divides: the case of Brazil," ILO Working Papers 994698493402676, International Labour Organization.
    7. Tas, Emcet O. & Reimao, Maira Emy & Orlando, Maria Beatriz, 2013. "Gender, ethnicity and cumulative disadvantage in education : evidence from Latin American and African censuses," Policy Research Working Paper Series 6734, The World Bank.
    8. repec:ilo:ilowps:469849 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. S. Charusheela, 2013. "Intersectionality," Chapters,in: Handbook of Research on Gender and Economic Life, chapter 3, pages 32-45 Edward Elgar Publishing.


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