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Social Provisioning As A Starting Point For Feminist Economics

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  • Marilyn Power

Abstract

The past decade has seen a proliferation of writing by feminist economists. Feminist economists are not identified with one particular economic paradigm, yet some common methodological points seem to be emerging. I propose making these starting points more explicit so that they can be examined, critiqued, and built upon. I use the term “social provisioning” to describe this emerging methodology. Its five main components are: incorporation of caring and unpaid labor as fundamental economic activities; use of well-being as a measure of economic success; analysis of economic, political, and social processes and power relations; inclusion of ethical goals and values as an intrinsic part of the analysis; and interrogation of differences by class, race-ethnicity, and other factors. The paper then provides brief illustrations of the use of this methodology in analyses of US welfare reform, gender and development, and feminist ecological economics.

Suggested Citation

  • Marilyn Power, 2004. "Social Provisioning As A Starting Point For Feminist Economics," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 10(3), pages 3-19.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:femeco:v:10:y:2004:i:3:p:3-19
    DOI: 10.1080/1354570042000267608
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Janet Spitz, 2010. "CEO Gender and the Malt Brewing Industry: Return of the Beer Witch, Ale-Wife, and Brewster," Forum for Social Economics, Springer;The Association for Social Economics, vol. 39(1), pages 33-42, April.
    2. Zdravka Todorova, 2013. "Conspicuous Consumption as Routine Expenditure and its Place in the Social Provisioning Process," American Journal of Economics and Sociology, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 72(5), pages 1183-1204, November.
    3. Shelley L. Koch & Joey Sprague, 2014. "Economic Sociology vs. Real Life: The Case of Grocery Shopping," American Journal of Economics and Sociology, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 73(1), pages 237-263, January.
    4. Nelson, Julie A., 2009. "Between a rock and a soft place: Ecological and feminist economics in policy debates," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 69(1), pages 1-8, November.
    5. Jo, Tae-Hee, 2016. "The Social Provisioning Process and Heterodox Economics," MPRA Paper 72384, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    6. Laura Camfield, 2014. "Growing Up in Ethiopia and Andhra Pradesh: The Impact of Social Protection Schemes on Girls’ Roles and Responsibilities," The European Journal of Development Research, Palgrave Macmillan;European Association of Development Research and Training Institutes (EADI), vol. 26(1), pages 107-123, January.
    7. McGrath, Simon & Powell, Lesley, 2016. "Skills for sustainable development: Transforming vocational education and training beyond 2015," International Journal of Educational Development, Elsevier, vol. 50(C), pages 12-19.
    8. Ramya Vijaya, 2007. "Trade, Job Losses and Gender: A Policy Perspective," Forum for Social Economics, Springer;The Association for Social Economics, vol. 36(2), pages 73-85, October.
    9. Zdravka Todorova, 2015. "A Veblenian articulation of the monetary theory of production," Working Papers PKWP1501, Post Keynesian Economics Study Group (PKSG).
    10. Zdravka, Todorova, 2009. "Employer of Last Resort Policy and Feminist Economics: Social Provisioning and Socialization of Investment," MPRA Paper 16240, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    11. Todorova, Zdravka, 2013. "Consumption as a Social Process within Social Provisioning and Capitalism: Implications for Heterodox Economics," MPRA Paper 51516, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    12. Lee, Frederic, 2011. "The making of heterodox microeconomics," MPRA Paper 30907, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    13. Zdravka Todorova, 2013. "Connecting social provisioning and functional finance in a post-Keynesian–Institutional analysis of the public sector," European Journal of Economics and Economic Policies: Intervention, Edward Elgar Publishing, vol. 10(1), pages 61-75.
    14. Todorova, Zdravka, 2014. "From Monetary Theory of Production to Culture-Nature Life Process:Feminist-Institutional Elaborations of Social Provisioning," MPRA Paper 54681, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    15. Faruk Ulgen, 2015. "Social provisioning and financial regulation: An Institutionalist-Minskyian agenda for reform," Post-Print halshs-01111183, HAL.
    16. Rao, Smriti, 2008. "Reforms with a Female Face: Gender, Liberalization, and Economic Policy in Andhra Pradesh, India," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 36(7), pages 1213-1232, July.
    17. Tae‐Hee Jo, 2011. "Social Provisioning Process and Socio‐Economic Modeling," American Journal of Economics and Sociology, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 70(5), pages 1094-1116, November.
    18. repec:bla:ecanth:v:4:y:2017:i:2:p:173-185 is not listed on IDEAS
    19. Jo, Tae-Hee, 2011. "Heterodox Critiques of Corporate Social Responsibility," MPRA Paper 35367, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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