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Race and ethnicity in the workplace

In: Handbook of Research on Gender and Economic Life

Listed author(s):
  • Marlene Kim
Registered author(s):

    The Handbook illuminates complex facets of the economic and social provisioning process across the globe. The contributors – academics, policy analysts and practitioners from wide-ranging areas of expertise – discuss the methodological approaches to, and analytical tools for, conducting research on the gender dimension of economic life. They also provide analyses of major issues facing both developed and developing countries. Topics explored include civil society, discrimination, informal work, working time, central bank policy, health, education, food security, poverty, migration, environmental activism and the financial crisis.

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    File URL: https://www.elgaronline.com/view/9780857930941.00025.xml
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    This chapter was published in:
  • Deborah M. Figart & Tonia L. Warnecke (ed.), 2013. "Handbook of Research on Gender and Economic Life," Books, Edward Elgar Publishing, number 14323.
  • This item is provided by Edward Elgar Publishing in its series Chapters with number 14323_14.
    Handle: RePEc:elg:eechap:14323_14
    Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.e-elgar.com

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    References listed on IDEAS
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    1. Heather Antecol & Kelly Bedard, 2002. "The Relative Earnings of Young Mexican, Black, and White Women," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 56(1), pages 122-135, October.
    2. Deborah Anderson & David Shapiro, 1996. "Racial Differences in Access to High-Paying Jobs and the Wage Gap between Black and White Women," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 49(2), pages 273-286, January.
    3. Kanchana Ruwanpura, 2008. "Multiple identities, multiple-discrimination: A critical review," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 14(3), pages 77-105.
    4. Stephen J. Trejo, 2003. "Intergenerational Progress of Mexican-Origin Workers in the U.S. Labor Market," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 38(3).
    5. Riach, Peter A & Rich, Judith, 1991. "Testing for Racial Discrimination in the Labour Market," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 15(3), pages 239-256, September.
    6. Mary J. Lopez, 2012. "Skilled Immigrant Women in the US and the Double Earnings Penalty," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 18(1), pages 99-134, January.
    7. Graham, John W. & Smith, Steven A., 2005. "Gender differences in employment and earnings in science and engineering in the US," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 24(3), pages 341-354, June.
    8. Mary Corcoran & Greg J. Duncan, 1979. "Work History, Labor Force Attachment, and Earnings Differences between the Races and Sexes," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 14(1), pages 3-20.
    9. Melissa Binder & Kate Krause & Janie Chermak & Jennifer Thacher & Julia Gilroy, 2010. "Same Work, Different Pay? Evidence from a US Public University," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 16(4), pages 105-135.
    10. Lois Joy, 2003. "Salaries of Recent Male and Female College Graduates: Educational and Labor Market Effects," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 56(4), pages 606-621, July.
    11. Daniel Sullivan & Till von Wachter, 2009. "Job Displacement and Mortality: An Analysis Using Administrative Data," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 124(3), pages 1265-1306.
    12. Marianne Bertrand & Sendhil Mullainathan, 2004. "Are Emily and Greg More Employable Than Lakisha and Jamal? A Field Experiment on Labor Market Discrimination," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 94(4), pages 991-1013, September.
    13. D. Mar, 2000. "Four decades of Asian American women's earnings: Japanese, Chinese, and Filipino American women's earnings 1960-1990," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 18(2), pages 228-237, 04.
    14. Munnell, Alicia H. & Geoffrey M. B. Tootell & Lynn E. Browne & James McEneaney, 1996. "Mortgage Lending in Boston: Interpreting HMDA Data," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 86(1), pages 25-53, March.
    15. Pascale Joassart-Marcelli, 2009. "The Spatial Determinants Of Wage Inequality: Evidence From Recent Latina Immigrants In Southern California," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 15(2), pages 33-72.
    16. Arthur Goldsmith & William Darity & Jonathan Veum, 1998. "Race, cognitive skills, psychological capital and wages," The Review of Black Political Economy, Springer;National Economic Association, vol. 26(2), pages 9-21, December.
    17. Chan, Sewin & Stevens, Ann Huff, 2001. "Job Loss and Employment Patterns of Older Workers," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 19(2), pages 484-521, April.
    18. Emilio J. Castilla, 2012. "Gender, Race, and the New (Merit-Based) Employment Relationship," Industrial Relations: A Journal of Economy and Society, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 51, pages 528-562, 04.
    19. James S. Cunningham & Nadja Zalokar, 1992. "The Economic Progress of Black Women, 1940–1980: Occupational Distribution and Relative Wages," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 45(3), pages 540-555, April.
    20. Francine D. Blau & Marianne A. Ferber, 1991. "Career Plans and Expectations of Young Women and Men: The Earnings Gap and Labor Force Participation," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 26(4), pages 581-607.
    21. Ruhm, Christopher J, 1991. "Are Workers Permanently Scarred by Job Displacements?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 81(1), pages 319-324, March.
    22. James J. Heckman, 1998. "Detecting Discrimination," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 12(2), pages 101-116, Spring.
    23. Leonard A. Carlson & Caroline Swartz, 1988. "The Earnings of Women and Ethnic Minorities, 1959–1979," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 41(4), pages 530-546, July.
    24. Randall S. Brown & Marilyn Moon & Barbara S. Zoloth, 1980. "Incorporating Occupational Attainment in Studies of Male-Female Earnings Differentials," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 15(1), pages 3-28.
    25. Elena Bardasi & Janet Gornick, 2008. "Working for less? Women's part-time wage penalties across countries," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 14(1), pages 37-72.
    26. Rose Brewer & Cecilia Conrad & Mary King, 2002. "The Complexities and Potential of Theorizing Gender, Caste, Race, and Class," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 8(2), pages 3-17.
    27. Carole Green & Marianne Ferber, 2005. "Do Detailed Work Histories Help to Explain Gender and Race/Ethnic Wage Differentials?," Review of Social Economy, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 63(1), pages 55-85.
    28. Blackburn, McKinley L., 2004. "The role of test scores in explaining race and gender differences in wages," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 23(6), pages 555-576, December.
    29. Eric Solberg, 2004. "Occupational assignment, hiring discrimination, and the gender pay gap," Atlantic Economic Journal, Springer;International Atlantic Economic Society, vol. 32(1), pages 11-27, March.
    30. Stevens, Ann Huff, 1997. "Persistent Effects of Job Displacement: The Importance of Multiple Job Losses," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 15(1), pages 165-188, January.
    31. repec:sae:ilrrev:v:41:y:1988:i:4:p:530-552 is not listed on IDEAS
    32. William A. Darity & Patrick L. Mason, 1998. "Evidence on Discrimination in Employment: Codes of Color, Codes of Gender," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 12(2), pages 63-90, Spring.
    33. Patrick Mason, 2011. "Moments of Disparate Peaks: Race-Gender Wage Gaps Among Mature Persons, 1965–2007," The Review of Black Political Economy, Springer;National Economic Association, vol. 38(1), pages 1-25, March.
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