IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/eee/wdevel/v46y2013icp30-44.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Missing Millions and Measuring Development Progress

Author

Listed:
  • Carr-Hill, Roy

Abstract

In developing countries, assessments of progress toward development goals are based increasingly on household surveys. These are inappropriate for obtaining information about the poorest. Typically, they omit by design: the homeless; those in institutions; and mobile, nomadic, or pastoralist populations. Moreover, in practice, household surveys typically under-represent: those in fragile, disjointed households; slum populations and areas posing security risks. Those six sub-groups constitute a large fraction of the “poorest of the poor”. We estimate that 250 million are missed worldwide from the sampling frames of such surveys and from many censuses and their omission may well lead to substantial biases.

Suggested Citation

  • Carr-Hill, Roy, 2013. "Missing Millions and Measuring Development Progress," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 46(C), pages 30-44.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:wdevel:v:46:y:2013:i:c:p:30-44
    DOI: 10.1016/j.worlddev.2012.12.017
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0305750X13000053
    Download Restriction: Full text for ScienceDirect subscribers only

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Paolo Valente, 2010. "Census taking in Europe: how are populations counted in 2010?," Population and Societies 467, Institut National d'Études Démographiques (INED).
    2. Margaret E. Grosh & Paul Glewwe, 1998. "Data Watch: The World Bank's Living Standards Measurement Study Household Surveys," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 12(1), pages 187-196, Winter.
    3. Ivo Imparato & Jeff Ruster, 2003. "Slum Upgrading and Participation : Lessons from Latin America," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 15133.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Taş, Emcet O. & Reimão, Maira Emy & Orlando, Maria Beatriz, 2014. "Gender, Ethnicity, and Cumulative Disadvantage in Education Outcomes," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 64(C), pages 538-553.
    2. repec:eee:wdevel:v:103:y:2018:i:c:p:297-310 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Carr-Hill, Roy, 2017. "Improving Population and Poverty Estimates with Citizen Surveys: Evidence from East Africa," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 93(C), pages 249-259.
    4. Christoph Lakner & Branko Milanovic, 2016. "Global Income Distribution: From the Fall of the Berlin Wall to the Great Recession," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 30(2), pages 203-232.
    5. Maira Emy Reimão & Emcet O. Taş, 2017. "Gender Education Gaps among Indigenous and Non-Indigenous Groups in Bolivia," Development and Change, International Institute of Social Studies, vol. 48(2), pages 228-262, March.
    6. Alex Cobham & Lukas Schlögl & Andy Sumner, 2016. "Inequality and the Tails: the Palma Proposition and Ratio," Global Policy, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 7(1), pages 25-36, February.
    7. Tas, Emcet O. & Reimao, Maira Emy & Orlando, Maria Beatriz, 2013. "Gender, ethnicity and cumulative disadvantage in education : evidence from Latin American and African censuses," Policy Research Working Paper Series 6734, The World Bank.
    8. repec:bpj:globdv:v:7:y:2016:i:2:p:18:n:2 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Alex Cobham & Luke Schlogl & Andy Sumner, 2015. "Inequality and the Tails: The Palma Proposition and Ratio Revisited," Working Papers 143, United Nations, Department of Economics and Social Affairs.
    10. Sabina Alkire and Emma Samman, 2014. "Mobilising the Household Data Required to Progress toward the SDGs," OPHI Working Papers ophiwp072, Queen Elizabeth House, University of Oxford.

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:eee:wdevel:v:46:y:2013:i:c:p:30-44. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Dana Niculescu). General contact details of provider: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/worlddev .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.