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Why are women in the Caribbean so much more likely than men to be unemployed?

Author

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  • Seguino, Stephanie

Abstract

Caribbean women are more likely than men to be unemployed, as evidenced by the economies studied here—Barbados, Jamaica, and Trinidad and Tobago. This paper uses aggregate data to explore macroeconomic factors that contribute to gender differentials in unemployment. National economic conditions and job segregation explain a portion of gender differences in unemployment, with men more likely to find employment during an economic upturn. Even within job categories, though, women’s unemployment rates are higher than men’s, suggesting employment discrimination. The results imply that economic growth is not sufficient to ensure equitable job access, and more targeted efforts are therefore necessary to ensure gender equity.

Suggested Citation

  • Seguino, Stephanie, 2003. "Why are women in the Caribbean so much more likely than men to be unemployed?," MPRA Paper 6507, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  • Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:6507
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    File URL: https://mpra.ub.uni-muenchen.de/6507/1/MPRA_paper_6507.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    7. R. N. Olsen & A. Coppin, 2001. "The Determinants of Gender Differences in Income in Trinidad and Tobago," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 37(5), pages 31-56.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Stephanie Seguino & Caren Grown, 2006. "Gender equity and globalization: macroeconomic policy for developing countries," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 18(8), pages 1081-1104.
    2. Stuart, Sheila, 2014. "The Beijing Platform For Action: twenty years of implementation in the Caribbean," Sede Subregional de la CEPAL para el Caribe (Estudios e Investigaciones) 38261, Naciones Unidas Comisión Económica para América Latina y el Caribe (CEPAL).
    3. repec:ilo:ilowps:411249 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Stephanie Seguino & Caren A. Grown, 2006. "Feminist-Kaleckian Macroeconomic Policy for Developing Countries," Economics Working Paper Archive wp_446, Levy Economics Institute.
    5. Riadh Ben Jelili, "undated". "The Arab Region's Unemployment Problem Revisited," API-Working Paper Series 1015, Arab Planning Institute - Kuwait, Information Center.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Gender; unemployment; growth and development; Caribbean; inequality;

    JEL classification:

    • J01 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - General - - - Labor Economics: General
    • J16 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination

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