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Patriarchal Norms, Religion, and Female Labor Supply: Evidence from Turkey

Listed author(s):
  • Dildar, Yasemin
Registered author(s):

    Despite significant structural and social change, the share of women working or seeking jobs in Turkey has declined. This paper focuses on the role of social conservatism as a constraint for women’s labor force participation using 2008 Demographic and Health Survey data. In analyzing labor supply model, I incorporate cultural constraints, specifically the sexual division of labor in the household and broader gender ideology into the analysis. I find that both patriarchal norms and religiosity are negatively associated with female labor force participation, and that the impact of patriarchal norms is statistically significant after controlling for endogeneity.

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    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0305750X15001527
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    Article provided by Elsevier in its journal World Development.

    Volume (Year): 76 (2015)
    Issue (Month): C ()
    Pages: 40-61

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    Handle: RePEc:eee:wdevel:v:76:y:2015:i:c:p:40-61
    DOI: 10.1016/j.worlddev.2015.06.010
    Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/worlddev

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