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Culture, Religiosity And Female Labor Supply

Author

Listed:
  • Gokce Uysal

    () (Bahcesehir University Center for Economic and Social Research)

  • Duygu Guner

    () (Katholieke Universiteit Leuven)

Abstract

Does culture affect female labor supply? In this paper, we address this question using a recent approach to measuring the effects of culture on economic outcomes, i.e. the epidemiological approach. We focus on migrants, who come from different cultures, but who share a common economic and institutional set-up today. Controlling for various individual characteristics including parental human capital as well as for current economic and institutional setup, we find that female employment rates in 1970 in a female migrant’s province of origin affects her labor supply behavior in 2008. We also show that it is the female employment rates and not male in the province of origin in 1970 that affects the current labor supply behavior. We also extend the epidemiological approach to analyze the effects of religion on female labor supply. More specifically, we use a proxy of parental religiosity, i.e. share of party votes in 1973 elections in Turkey to study female labor supply in 2008. Our findings indicate that female migrants from provinces that had larger (smaller) shares of the religious party votes in 1973 are less (more) likely to participate in the labor market in 2008. An extended model where both cultural and religiosity proxies are included shows that culture and religiosity have separately significant effects on female labor supply behavior.

Suggested Citation

  • Gokce Uysal & Duygu Guner, 2014. "Culture, Religiosity And Female Labor Supply," Working Papers 013, Bahcesehir University, Betam.
  • Handle: RePEc:bae:wpaper:013
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Guiso, Luigi & Sapienza, Paola & Zingales, Luigi, 2003. "People's opium? Religion and economic attitudes," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 50(1), pages 225-282, January.
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    Cited by:

    1. Alessia LO TURCO & Daniela MAGGIONI, 2016. "For God's sake. The impact of religious proximity on firms' exports," Working Papers 418, Universita' Politecnica delle Marche (I), Dipartimento di Scienze Economiche e Sociali.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • J16 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination
    • J21 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Labor Force and Employment, Size, and Structure
    • Z10 - Other Special Topics - - Cultural Economics - - - General

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