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Does Religion Influence the Labour Supply of Married Women in Germany?

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  • Guido Heineck

Abstract

On behavioural theory basis, this article analyses whether religion influences married women in Germany in their decision to supply labour. Gender roles and accompanying attitudes toward the appropriate division of labour among spouses might differ across religious groups depending on the groups´ strictness. Using data from the German Socio-Economic Panel (GSOEP) and applying both cross-sectional and longitudinal data analysis techniques the findings from the estimated reduced form participation equations suggest that denominational affiliation itself only weakly influences a woman´s decision whether to work or not. However, women who attach importance to faith in their lives tend to work less than women without a strong conviction. Furthermore, taking into account the family background of individuals and supposing that employment decisions are bargained over among household members, there is evidence that the existence of a spouse with a strong conviction also affects a woman´s supply of labour negatively.

Suggested Citation

  • Guido Heineck, 2002. "Does Religion Influence the Labour Supply of Married Women in Germany?," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 278, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:diw:diwwpp:dp278
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Female labour supply; religious attitudes;

    JEL classification:

    • J22 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Time Allocation and Labor Supply
    • Z12 - Other Special Topics - - Cultural Economics - - - Religion

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