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Modeling religious behavior and economic outcome: Is the relationship bicausal?: Evidence from a survey of Mississippi households

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  • Arano, Kathleen G.
  • Blair, Benjamin F.

Abstract

This paper examines simultaneity between religious intensity and income. Most of the literature to date has examined either the impact of religion on economic outcomes or the impact of economic outcomes on religious activities. Our estimation offers evidence of a bicausal relationship. We find frequency of attendance to religious services is a normal good; low-income households are less likely to be active in religious activities; and low-religious intensity households are less likely to be in the high-income category.

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  • Arano, Kathleen G. & Blair, Benjamin F., 2008. "Modeling religious behavior and economic outcome: Is the relationship bicausal?: Evidence from a survey of Mississippi households," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 37(5), pages 2043-2053, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:soceco:v:37:y:2008:i:5:p:2043-2053
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Cameron, Samuel, 1999. "Faith, frequency, and the allocation of time: a micro level study of religious capital and participation," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 28(4), pages 439-456.
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    Cited by:

    1. Xingqiang Du & Wei Jian & Yingjie Du & Wentao Feng & Quan Zeng, 2014. "Religion, the Nature of Ultimate Owner, and Corporate Philanthropic Giving: Evidence from China," Journal of Business Ethics, Springer, vol. 123(2), pages 235-256, August.
    2. Xingqiang Du, 2015. "Does Confucianism Reduce Minority Shareholder Expropriation? Evidence from China," Journal of Business Ethics, Springer, vol. 132(4), pages 661-716, December.
    3. Xingqiang Du & Wei Jian & Shaojuan Lai & Yingjie Du & Hongmei Pei, 2015. "Does Religion Mitigate Earnings Management? Evidence from China," Journal of Business Ethics, Springer, vol. 131(3), pages 699-749, October.

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