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Church attendance in Great Britain: An ordered logit approach

Author

Listed:
  • John Sawkins
  • Paul Seaman
  • Hector Williams

Abstract

The church attendance decision of individual economic agents is analysed within a Becker-style allocation of time framework. Using an ordered logit model with data derived from the British Household Panel Study (BHPS) separate attendance equations are estimated for males and females. The empirical results, in line with previous North American studies, suggest that labour income variables do account for some of the variation in attendance. In addition, attendance is found to be correlated with factors such as denominational affiliation, educational attainment and intensity of belief.

Suggested Citation

  • John Sawkins & Paul Seaman & Hector Williams, 1997. "Church attendance in Great Britain: An ordered logit approach," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 29(2), pages 125-134.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:applec:v:29:y:1997:i:2:p:125-134
    DOI: 10.1080/000368497327209
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Guido Heineck, 2001. "The Determinants of Church Attendance and Religious Human Capital in Germany: Evidence from Panel Data," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 263, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
    2. Permani, Risti, 2011. "The presence of religious organisations, religious attendance and earnings: Evidence from Indonesia," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 40(3), pages 247-258, May.
    3. Hungerman, Daniel M., 2014. "The effect of education on religion: Evidence from compulsory schooling laws," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 104(C), pages 52-63.
    4. Pablo Branas-Garza, 2004. "Church attendance in Spain (1930-1992): Gender differences and secularization," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 26(1), pages 1-9.
    5. Esa Mangeloja, 2007. "Preaching to the choir? Economic analysis of Church Growth," Papers on Economics of Religion 07/02, Department of Economic Theory and Economic History of the University of Granada..
    6. Webber, Don J. & Freke, Martin, 2006. "Church organists: Analysing their willingness to play," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 35(5), pages 854-867, October.
    7. Heineck, Guido, 2004. "Does religion influence the labor supply of married women in Germany?," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 33(3), pages 307-328, July.
    8. L. Bettendorf & E. Dijkgraaf, 2008. "Religion and Income," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 08-014/3, Tinbergen Institute.
    9. Anil Rupasingha & David Freshwater, 2001. "Economics of Religious Participation in the Rural South," The Review of Regional Studies, Southern Regional Science Association, vol. 29(3), pages 256-271, Winter.
    10. Ian Smith & John Sawkins, 2003. "The economics of regional variation in religious attendance," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 35(14), pages 1577-1588.
    11. Bruno, Bruna & Fiorillo, Damiano, 2013. "Voluntary work and labour income," MPRA Paper 43995, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    12. Bruna BRUNO & Damiano FIORILLO, 2016. "Voluntary Work And Wages," Annals of Public and Cooperative Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 87(2), pages 175-202, December.
    13. Cameron, Samuel, 1999. "Faith, frequency, and the allocation of time: a micro level study of religious capital and participation," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 28(4), pages 439-456.
    14. Robert Mochrie & John Sawkins & Alexander Naumov, 2008. "Competition and Participation in Religious Markets: Evidence from Victorian Scotland," Review of Social Economy, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 66(4), pages 437-467.
    15. Brown, Sarah & Taylor, Karl, 2007. "Religion and education: Evidence from the National Child Development Study," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 63(3), pages 439-460, July.
    16. Bettendorf, L. & Dijkgraaf, E., 2010. "Religion and income: Heterogeneity between countries," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 74(1-2), pages 12-29, May.
    17. Mangeloja, Esa & Ovaska, Tomi, 2010. "Mode of Delivery and the Effectiveness of Foreign Aid: The Example of Missionary Work," Review of Applied Economics, Review of Applied Economics, vol. 6(1-2).
    18. Granger, Karen & Lu, Vinh Nhat & Conduit, Jodie & Veale, Roberta & Habel, Cullen, 2014. "Keeping the faith! Drivers of participation in spiritually-based communities," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 67(2), pages 68-75.
    19. Wang, Qunyong & Lin, Xinyu, 2014. "Does religious beliefs affect economic growth? Evidence from provincial-level panel data in China," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 31(C), pages 277-287.
    20. Per-Ola Maneschiƶld & Bengt Haraldsson, 2007. "Religious Norms and Labour Supply of Married Women in Sweden," Finnish Economic Papers, Finnish Economic Association, vol. 20(1), pages 41-56, Spring.
    21. Jean-Paul Carvalho, 2009. "A Theory of the Islamic Revival," Economics Series Working Papers 424, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
    22. Esa Mangeloja, 2005. "Economic growth and religious production efficiency," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 37(20), pages 2349-2359.
    23. Brown, Timothy Tyler, 2009. "Rational praying: The economics of prayer," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 38(1), pages 37-44, January.
    24. repec:ebl:ecbull:v:26:y:2004:i:1:p:1-9 is not listed on IDEAS

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