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Analyzing Religiosity Within an Economic Framework: The Case of Spanish Catholics

Author

Listed:
  • Garza, Pablo Brañas

    (University of Jaén)

  • Neuman, Shoshana

    (Bar-Ilan University)

Abstract

Using a sample of Spanish Catholics, we examined the level of religiosity (measured by beliefs, prayer and church attendance) and the relationship between religiosity and various socio-economic variables. An Ordered Logit estimation of religiosity equations showed that: women are more religious than men; religious activity increases with age; there is a (marginally) significant positive relationship between schooling and religiosity; religiosity is positively related to exposure to religious activity during childhood; and male religious activity is positively affected by marital status (being married to a catholic wife) and by the number of children at home. The results also demonstrate the importance of the “salvation motive” for the two genders and the presence of the “professional utilitarian motive” in male religious behaviour.

Suggested Citation

  • Garza, Pablo Brañas & Neuman, Shoshana, 2003. "Analyzing Religiosity Within an Economic Framework: The Case of Spanish Catholics," IZA Discussion Papers 868, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp868
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Spain; religiosity; prayer; church attendance; education; Ordered Logit;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • Z12 - Other Special Topics - - Cultural Economics - - - Religion
    • I21 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Analysis of Education

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