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Privatizing the Church: Disestablishment in Connecticut and Massachusetts

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  • Olds, Kelly

Abstract

Tax-supported churches were established in most American colonies. Public Congregationalist churches in New England were not privatized until the early nineteenth century. After privatization, demand for preachers rose rapidly. There is weaker evidence that church membership also rose quickly. The increase in preachers came almost totally from private denominations. The privatization of religion was further accompanied by a change in methods of finance. Copyright 1994 by University of Chicago Press.

Suggested Citation

  • Olds, Kelly, 1994. "Privatizing the Church: Disestablishment in Connecticut and Massachusetts," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 102(2), pages 277-297, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:ucp:jpolec:v:102:y:1994:i:2:p:277-97
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Margo, Robert A. & Villaflor, Georgia C., 1987. "The Growth of Wages in Antebellum America: New Evidence," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 47(04), pages 873-895, December.
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    Cited by:

    1. Jeffry M. Netter & William L. Megginson, 2001. "From State to Market: A Survey of Empirical Studies on Privatization," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 39(2), pages 321-389, June.
    2. Pablo BraÒas-Garza & Shoshana Neuman, 2004. "Analyzing Religiosity within an Economic Framework: The Case of Spanish Catholics," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 2(1), pages 5-22, March.
    3. Richard L. Stroup, 2003. "Economic freedom and environmental quality," Proceedings, Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas, issue Oct, pages 73-90.
    4. Robert J. Barro & Rachel M. McCleary, 2005. "Which Countries Have State Religions?," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 120(4), pages 1331-1370.
    5. Robert Mochrie & John Sawkins & Alexander Naumov, 2008. "Competition and Participation in Religious Markets: Evidence from Victorian Scotland," Review of Social Economy, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 66(4), pages 437-467.
    6. Pyne, Derek, 2013. "An afterlife capital model of religious choice," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 92(C), pages 32-44.

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