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Shocking Behavior : Random Wealth in Antebellum Georgia and Human Capital Across Generations

  • Hoyt Bleakley
  • Joseph P. Ferrie

Does the lack of wealth constrain parents' investments in the human capital of their descendants? We conduct a fifty-year followup of an episode in which such constraints would have been plausibly relaxed by a random allocation of wealth to families. We track descendants of those eligible to win in Georgia's Cherokee Land Lottery of 1832, which had nearly universal participation among adult white males. Winners received close to the median level of wealth - a large financial windfall orthogonal to parents' underlying characteristics that might have also affected their children's human capital. Although winners had slightly more children than non-winners, they did not send them to school more. Sons of winners have no better adult outcomes (wealth, income, literacy) than the sons of non-winners, and winners' grandchildren do not have higher literacy or school attendance than non-winners' grandchildren. This suggests only a limited role for family financial resources in the transmission of human capital across generations and a potentially more important role for other factors that persist through family lines.

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File URL: http://www.nber.org/papers/w19348.pdf
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Paper provided by National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc in its series NBER Working Papers with number 19348.

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Date of creation: Aug 2013
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Publication status: published as Hoyt Bleakley & Joseph Ferrie, 2016. "Shocking Behavior: Random Wealth in Antebellum Georgia and Human Capital Across Generations," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, vol 131(3), pages 1455-1495.
Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:19348
Note: CH DAE DEV LS
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