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The Intergenerational Effects of Compulsory Schooling

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  • Philip Oreopoulos
  • Marianne E. Page

Abstract

This article attempts to improve our understanding of the causal processes that contribute to intergenerational immobility by exploiting historical changes in compulsory schooling laws that affected the educational attainment of parents without affecting their innate abilities or endowments. We examine the influence of parental compulsory schooling on children's grade-for-age using the 1960, 1970, and 1980 U.S. censuses. Our estimates indicate that a 1-year increase in the education of either parent reduces the probability that a child repeats a grade by between 2 and 4 percentage points.

Suggested Citation

  • Philip Oreopoulos & Marianne E. Page, 2006. "The Intergenerational Effects of Compulsory Schooling," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 24(4), pages 729-760, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:ucp:jlabec:v:24:y:2006:i:4:p:729-760
    DOI: 10.1086/506484
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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • J62 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Job, Occupational and Intergenerational Mobility; Promotion
    • I20 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - General

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