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Understanding the Intergenerational Transmission of Human Capital: Evidence from a Quasi-natural Experiment in China

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  • Dong Zhou
  • Aparajita Dasgupta

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  • Dong Zhou & Aparajita Dasgupta, 2017. "Understanding the Intergenerational Transmission of Human Capital: Evidence from a Quasi-natural Experiment in China," Review of Development Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 21(2), pages 321-352, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:rdevec:v:21:y:2017:i:2:p:321-352
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