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Vive la Révolution! Long-Term Educational Returns of 1968 to the Angry Students

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  • Eric Maurin
  • Sandra McNally

Abstract

The famous events of May 1968, starting with student riots, threw France into a state of turmoil. As a result, normal examination procedures were abandoned, and the pass rate for various qualifications increased enormously. The lowering of thresholds at critical stages of the education system enabled a proportion of students to pursue more years of higher education than would otherwise have been possible. For those on the margin of passing their examinations, additional years of higher education increased future wages and occupational levels. Interestingly, the effect is also transmitted across generations and is reflected in the educational performance of children.

Suggested Citation

  • Eric Maurin & Sandra McNally, 2008. "Vive la Révolution! Long-Term Educational Returns of 1968 to the Angry Students," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 26, pages 1-33.
  • Handle: RePEc:ucp:jlabec:v:26:y:2008:p:1-33 DOI: 10.1086/522071
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    References listed on IDEAS

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