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Regional Wage Gaps and the Settlement of the Midwest

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  • Margo, Robert A.

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  • Margo, Robert A., 1999. "Regional Wage Gaps and the Settlement of the Midwest," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 36(2), pages 128-143, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:exehis:v:36:y:1999:i:2:p:128-143
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    1. Mak, James & Walton, Gary M., 1972. "Steamboats and the Great Productivity Surge In River Transportation," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 32(03), pages 619-640, September.
    2. Howard Bodenhorn & Hugh Rockoff, 1992. "Regional Interest Rates in Antebellum America," NBER Chapters,in: Strategic Factors in Nineteenth Century American Economic History: A Volume to Honor Robert W. Fogel, pages 159-187 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Williamson Jeffrey G., 1995. "The Evolution of Global Labor Markets since 1830: Background Evidence and Hypotheses," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 32(2), pages 141-196, April.
    4. Claudia Goldin & Robert A. Margo, 1992. "Wages, Prices, and Labor Markets before the Civil War," NBER Chapters,in: Strategic Factors in Nineteenth Century American Economic History: A Volume to Honor Robert W. Fogel, pages 67-104 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Coelho, Philip R. P. & Shepherd, James F., 1974. "Differences in Regional Prices: The United States, 1851–1880," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 34(03), pages 551-591, September.
    6. Lebergott, Stanley, 1985. "The Demand for Land: The United States, 1820–1860," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 45(02), pages 181-212, June.
    7. Fleisig, Heywood, 1976. "Slavery, the Supply of Agricultural Labor, and the Industrialization of the South," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 36(03), pages 572-597, September.
    8. Rosenbloom, Joshua L., 1996. "Was There a National Labor Market at the End of the Nineteenth Century? New Evidence on Earnings in Manufacturing," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 56(03), pages 626-656, September.
    9. Rosenbloom, Joshua L., 1991. "Occupational Differences in Labor Market Integration: The United States in 1890," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 51(02), pages 427-439, June.
    10. Craig, Lee A., 1991. "The Value of Household Labor in Antebellum Northern Agriculture," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 51(01), pages 67-81, March.
    11. David W. Galenson & Clayne L. Pope, 1992. "Precedence and Wealth: Evidence from Nineteenth-Century Utah," NBER Chapters,in: Strategic Factors in Nineteenth Century American Economic History: A Volume to Honor Robert W. Fogel, pages 225-241 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    12. Margo, Robert A. & Villaflor, Georgia C., 1987. "The Growth of Wages in Antebellum America: New Evidence," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 47(04), pages 873-895, December.
    13. Craig, Lee A & Palmquist, Raymond B & Weiss, Thomas, 1998. "Transportation Improvements and Land Values in the Antebellum United States: A Hedonic Approach," The Journal of Real Estate Finance and Economics, Springer, vol. 16(2), pages 173-189, March.
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    Cited by:

    1. Álvarez, Jorge & Bilancini, Ennio & D'Alessandro, Simone & Porcile, Gabriel, 2011. "Agricultural institutions, industrialization and growth: The case of New Zealand and Uruguay in 1870-1940," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 48(2), pages 151-168, April.
    2. Galor, Oded & Munshi, Kaivan & Wilson, Nicolas, 2013. "Inclusive Institutions and Long-Run Misallocation," MPRA Paper 51643, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Guillaume Vandenbroucke, 2008. "The American Frontier: Technology versus Immigration," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 11(2), pages 283-301, April.
    4. Jon Bakija & Adam Cole & Bradley Heim, 2008. "Jobs and Income Growth of Top Earners and the Causes of Changing Income Inequality: Evidence from U.S. Tax Return Data," Department of Economics Working Papers 2010-22, Department of Economics, Williams College, revised Jan 2012.
    5. Robert A. Margo, 2014. "The economic history of migration: the pre-World War One USA as lens," Chapters,in: International Handbook on Migration and Economic Development, chapter 3, pages 42-64 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    6. Salisbury, Laura, 2014. "Selective migration, wages, and occupational mobility in nineteenth century America," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 53(C), pages 40-63.
    7. Kaivan Munshi & Nicholas Wilson, 2008. "Identity, Parochial Institutions, and Occupational Choice: Linking the Past to the Present in the American Midwest," NBER Working Papers 13717, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    8. Stanley L. Engerman & Robert A. Margo, 2010. "Free Labor and Slave Labor," NBER Chapters,in: Founding Choices: American Economic Policy in the 1790s, pages 291-314 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    9. Robert A. Margo, 2002. "The North-South Wage Gap, Before and After the Civil War," NBER Working Papers 8778, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

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