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American Economic Growth and Standards of Living before the Civil War

Author

Listed:
  • Robert E. Gallman
  • John Joseph Wallis

Abstract

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Suggested Citation

  • Robert E. Gallman & John Joseph Wallis, 1992. "American Economic Growth and Standards of Living before the Civil War," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number gall92-1, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberbk:gall92-1
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Thorp, Rosemary, 1987. "Trends and cycles in the Peruvian economy," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, pages 355-374.
    2. Dornbusch, Rudiger, 1982. "Stabilization policies in developing countries: What have we learned?," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 10(9), pages 701-708, September.
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    Cited by:

    1. Greenwood, Jeremy & Yorukoglu, Mehmet, 1997. "1974," Carnegie-Rochester Conference Series on Public Policy, Elsevier, pages 49-95.
    2. Rosenbloom, Joshua L. & Weiss, Thomas, 2014. "Economic growth in the Mid-Atlantic region: Conjectural estimates for 1720 to 1800," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 51(C), pages 41-59.
    3. Sven Wilson & Clayne L. Pope, 2003. "The Height of Union Army Recruits. Family and Community Influences," NBER Chapters,in: Health and Labor Force Participation over the Life Cycle: Evidence from the Past, pages 113-146 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Komlos, John, 2012. "A Three-Decade “Kuhnian” History of the Antebellum Puzzle: Explaining the shrinking of the US population at the onset of modern economic growth," Discussion Papers in Economics 12758, University of Munich, Department of Economics.
    5. Angus Maddison, 1997. "Causal Influences on Productivity Performance 1820–1992: A Global Perspective," Journal of Productivity Analysis, Springer, vol. 8(4), pages 325-359, November.
    6. Greenwood, Jeremy & Yorukoglu, Mehmet, 1997. "1974," Carnegie-Rochester Conference Series on Public Policy, Elsevier, pages 49-95.
      • Greenwood, J. & Yorukoglu, M., 1996. "1974," RCER Working Papers 429, University of Rochester - Center for Economic Research (RCER).
    7. Peter H. Lindert & Jeffrey G. Williamson, 2012. "American Incomes 1774-1860," NBER Working Papers 18396, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    8. Rodney Ramcharan, 2002. "Migration and Human Capital Formation; Theory and Evidence From the U.S. High School Movement," IMF Working Papers 02/123, International Monetary Fund.
    9. Lindert, Peter H. & Williamson, Jeffrey G., 2013. "American Incomes Before and After the Revolution," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 73(03), pages 725-765, September.
    10. Wallis, John & Weingast, Barry, 2005. "The Financing of 19th Century Internal Improvements," Department of Economics, Working Paper Series qt7nh1c6df, Department of Economics, Institute for Business and Economic Research, UC Berkeley.
    11. Peter C. Mancall & Joshua L. Rosenbloom & Thomas Weiss, 2000. "Conjectural Estimates of Economic Growth in the Lower South, 1720 to 1800," NBER Historical Working Papers 0126, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

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