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The Transmission of Women's Fertility, Human Capital and Work Orientation Across Immigrant Generations

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Listed:
  • Francine D. Blau
  • Lawrence M. Kahn
  • Albert Yung-Hsu Liu
  • Kerry L. Papps

Abstract

Using 1995-2011 Current Population Survey and 1970-2000 Census data, we find that the fertility, education and labor supply of second generation women (US-born women with at least one foreign-born parent) are significantly positively affected by the immigrant generation's levels of these variables, with the effect of the fertility and labor supply of women from the mother's source country generally larger than that of women from the father's source country and the effect of the education of men from the father's source country larger than that of women from the mother's source country. We present some evidence that suggests our findings for fertility and labor supply are due to at least in part to intergenerational transmission of gender roles. Transmission rates for immigrant fertility and labor supply between generations are higher than for education, but there is considerable intergenerational assimilation toward native levels for all three of these outcomes.

Suggested Citation

  • Francine D. Blau & Lawrence M. Kahn & Albert Yung-Hsu Liu & Kerry L. Papps, 2008. "The Transmission of Women's Fertility, Human Capital and Work Orientation Across Immigrant Generations," NBER Working Papers 14388, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:14388
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • J1 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics
    • J16 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination
    • J22 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Time Allocation and Labor Supply
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • J61 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Geographic Labor Mobility; Immigrant Workers

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